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The new hit project from WND Books, “The Magic Man in the Sky,” is being called a “muscular defense of Christian faith” as it continues to gather widespread acclaim.

In a recent column in The Washington Times, Jeffrey T. Kuhner praised Carl Gallups’ book as “a must-read.”

“In ‘The Magic Man in the Sky,’ Mr. Gallups explodes the numerous myths advanced by atheists. Lucidly written, cogent and compelling, the book is a muscular defense of the Christian faith. Its unique strength is that it provides readers – in particular, college students – with an arsenal of powerful rebuttals against Christian-bashers,” writes Kuhner.

“Its central theme can be distilled to one seminal idea: the secular argument that Christianity is an outdated, primitive institution peddling a superstitious faith in God – the ‘magic man in the sky’ – is false,” Kuhner writes. “In fact, Mr. Gallups shows it is atheism that requires much greater, almost blind faith. The author demonstrates that modern science – contrary to myth – proves that the universe, human DNA and the solar system are so perfect and yet immensely complex that only a higher all-powerful being – God – could have created them. In short, Darwinian evolution or the Big Bang theory is a hoax.”

Gallups contends the Christian “has no need to be intimidated by the atheist and/or the evolutionist who attempts to assert that evolution is settled science.”

“It is not,” he writes. “It is fascinating speculation, but it is not settled science.”

Mike Dunn, the host of Quest for Character, said of Gallups’ work: “There’s one book that has changed my life, and so many aspects that I got from it I can use in my quiver and that is ‘The Magic Man in the Sky.’”

“So many people who have read it, they use those words, and it just blows me away,” said Galllups.

Dunn said the book “is really laid out well, as you can go to it each day, read a chapter, and then – pretty soon – when you are challenged by an atheist, you know exactly what to say so that truth wins out.”

Dunn added: “This would be a tremendous book for churches as a study guide, using what you write over a 15-week course discussing one chapter at a time, doing role play and getting feedback on engaging those who don’t believe.”

Gallups said people “are not only using it as a study guide, but for witnessing.”

“The Magic Man in the Sky” is available for purchase at the WND Superstore.

Since its release in the middle of May, “The Magic Man in the Sky” has been one of the top selling Christian books on Amazon.com, consistently ranking No. 1 in sales in the “Science and Religion” category.

On a recent television appearance on Atlanta Live! with John Pace, Gallups said, “The book starts with a secularist, evolutionary argument that most Christians aren’t prepared to debate, ‘I don’t believe in God for the same reason I don’t believe in other fairy tales.’

“It is a sweeping defense of the Christian faith, using settled, scientific fact that has been scrutinized by scientific method, a healthy dose of solid logic, and a healthy, healthy dose of contextually interpreted scripture,” Gallups told Pace on Atlanta Live!.

Gallups is the long-time senior pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton, Fla. Additionally, he is a conference leader, evangelist and Christian media entrepreneur.

Gallups is one of the founders of the world-famous PPSIMMONS YouTube ministry and biblical apologetics channel. A prominent conservative talk radio host and biblical/political media guest commentator, he is a graduate of Florida State University and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

 

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