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The latest numbers on jobs and the economy do not bode well for the Obama campaign. The bad news on the economy will add fuel to the brushfire that will soon turn into an inferno. Can you spell O-b-a-m-a- M-e-l-t-d-o-w-n?

Obama’s campaign meltdown will soon yield to the Obama panic, which means the country will be in store for even more dramatic Obama theatrics. This summer will be a very dangerous period for our country because there are no limits to the nasty measures Obama and his gang of SEIU thugs will undertake to hang onto the White House.

The embarrassing job-growth numbers are giving major elements of the 2008 Obama coalition good reasons to abandon ship. The 2012 election is not a referendum on the economy; it is a referendum on Obama’s disastrous agenda as a whole. But the chickens are certainly coming home to roost for the Obama “stimulus plan” that cost taxpayers $4 million for each job created. Even a Rockefeller Foundation diversity-grants administrator knows that is not a sustainable “recovery plan.”

Obama acolytes in the millionaire class will have second thoughts about their commitments to “progressivism” when the only jobs their college-graduate children can find are at Starbucks and an Amazon call center. It’s all Bush’s fault? That dog won’t hunt any longer.

To be sure, there will be swings in the poll numbers, and Romney must stay on the offense and not take anything for granted. Given the money and labor resources at Obama’s command, Republicans need to “run scared” and avoid undue optimism and complacency. Still, it is not too early for Republican strategists and conservative think tanks to begin thinking about the broad outlines of a legislative agenda for January of 2013.

Republicans should take a page or two from the Democrats’ operations manual when it comes to implementing an election mandate. Jan. 20, 2013, will likely see not only Mitt Romney in the White House, but Republican majorities in both the House and Senate. What will they do with those majorities?

The tea party is not alone in saying that it’s not too soon to begin asking those questions. After the “Watergate wipeout” of 1974, Democrats in that freshmen class of Congress did not interpret their mandate as simply cleaning up the ethical debris from Nixon’s Watergate scandal. They embarked on a very aggressive legislative agenda.

In 1964, when Lyndon Johnson was handed overwhelming majorities in the Congress, he proceeded to ram through dozens of “Great Society” programs. Will Republicans have the vision and the political smarts to use their new majorities for a remake of the policy landscape in Washington?

Repealing Obamacare is a necessity, and it must be repealed root and branch, not merely “fixed.” But can Republicans also think strategically and tackle some of the deep problems that put the nation on a path to bankruptcy and ruin?

Here area few ideas to get the ball rolling. First, let’s repeal Teddy Kennedy’s disastrous 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act and enact genuine “comprehensive immigration reform.” We should repeal the family reunification entitlements in current immigration law and limit family reunification to parents and minor children, not others. Second, we need to set a numerical limit of 300,000 green cards annually for the next decade to give the country time to adequately assimilate immigrants already here. Third, let’s restore the preference for immigrants with job skills we actually need.

Next, let’s repeal No Child Left Behind, the federal government’s expensive failed plan for improving K-12 education. Then let’s cut the EPA bureaucracy by two-thirds and repeal a good hunk of EPA regulations that are hampering job creation in our beleaguered economy. Also, Congress should repeal Dodd-Frank and a dozen other overreaching federal power-grabs.

Auditing the Federal Reserve is a good first step toward returning it to its original mission.

On the foreign-policy front, President Romney must use his wide discretionary powers to immediately clean house at the State Department. After appointing John Bolton as the new secretary of state, he can recall our ambassador from Iran and send a private emissary to tell President Ahmadinejad that he has five days to announce the suspension of all nuclear energy programs and to invite the IAEA to conduct unimpeded inspections of all facilities.

On his first day in office, Secretary of State Bolton should announce that all U.S. contributions to the United Nations are being suspended pending a thorough review by an independent citizens commission headed by former Attorney General Ed Meese.

That’s a good start, but only a start.

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