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A California insurance agent says his life is in danger because of an erroneous story by an Associated Press reporter on a night shift in Los Angeles stating Muslims were rioting and killing Americans in Libya because they were angered by a movie called “The Innocence of Muslims.”

Steve Klein now is getting protection from the FBI after receiving hundreds of death threats, being banned from visiting England and having an Islamic fatwa placed against his life.

He told WND it’s all because AP reporter Shaya Tayefe Mohajer identified him as a “consultant” to the film that the Obama administration determinedly blamed for sparking unrest and eventually a riot in Libya that ended with the deaths of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

However, intelligence reports indicate administration officials knew within hours that the Benghazi incident on 9/11 was an organized terror attack on America, not the result of unrest over a film.

Mohajer reported within hours of the attack: “Protesters angered over [the] film opened fire on and burned down the U.S. consulate in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi, killing an American diplomat on Tuesday.”

Michael Medved, in a Sept. 13 column, singled out the AP reporter.

“Despite the dubious nature of the AP story (filed by 33-year-old journalist Shaya Tayefe Mohajer, who maintains an on-line profile at the Iranian-American Heritage Foundation of Southern California) the anti-Semitic references to ’100 Jewish donors’ and the fingering of the writer-director as ‘an Israeli Jew had circulated around the world before anyone seriously questioned them.”

The Iranian-American reporter received so much attention after her story that, via Twitter, she directed reporters wishing to speak to her to the AP corporate offices rather than her email address.

Now, without explanation, nearly every link to a story written by Mohajer around the Sept. 12 time frame for AP comes up with a page stating: “The article requested is no longer available.”

Despite the broken AP links, the report was recorded on multiple websites around the world. It’s titled “Filmmaker Hides After Deadly Protests.”

“An Israeli filmmaker went into hiding Tuesday after his movie attacking Islam’s prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims on U.S. missions in Egypt and Libya, where one American was killed,” says the report.

It is this report, which has since been shown to be incorrect, that nevertheless fed the establishment press narrative for weeks to come.

Klein said it has placed his life in jeopardy.

After filing the story, Mohajer then re-tweeted CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour’s message calling the filmmaker a “punk.”

Amanpour’s statement, retweeted by Mohajer, said, “AP now says the U.S. identifies anti-Muslim filmmaker as Coptic Christian. … I’m outraged at this punk.”

Klein, the host of a weekly video commentary called “Wake Up America,” broadcast to a worldwide television audience, received a call from Mohajer, who listed him in her report as a “consultant” for the film, even though he had spoken to the filmmaker only twice.

After her report, he immediately became fodder for the press and angry Muslims worldwide.

WND has learned that the filmmaker approached Klein well over a year ago for an opinion about a film that he hadn’t even made, because of Klein’s ardent support of the First Amendment.

Klein told WND: “Sam [Bacile] respected my opinion about the First Amendment and asked if I’d help his English language barrier regarding his soon-to-be-produced video, if the need for clarification or any questions should ever arise.”

When Sept. 11 arrived, and news started coming in about an attacks being linked to the trailer for the film, Klein got a call from Bacile asking him to talk to an AP reporter named Shaya Mohajer. Klein agreed to speak with her.

After the interview, Klein’s name appeared in the news, and he was inundated with calls and visits to his home and office by many reporter around the world.

Within days, he needed police protection.

“After Shaya published my name, my wife and I spent 15 hours talking to reporters from all over the world,” Klein told WND.

Klein said that he thought he would be asked about the First Amendment regarding the film and was instead blamed for American deaths.

Klein said that he has never even seen the film in question, yet the reporters were set on blaming him for the deaths.

“Even reporters from Tokyo asked identical questions to the reporters from CNN and the like,” Klein said. “It was amazing how they all parroted the Washington line.”

Perhaps what was most shocking, according to Klein, was the media’s complete lack of interest in finding out who really was to blame.

“For fifteen hours, reporter after reporter wanted to blame the film for the violence and death, rather than those actually committing the violence and murder.”

Klein said reporters tried to pin the deaths on him, and especially the film, which as far as he knows is a factual depiction of Islam.

“When Muslims are insulted and rampage, even going as far as killing fellow human beings in the name of being insulted, are they the ones who deserve an apology?” Klein asked.

“If I sit in a court of law and under oath testify to the truth, yet people outside the courtroom don’t like the truth and begin rioting, is that my fault for telling the truth?”

He said that is precisely what he told a number of reporters on Sept. 12, and his words angered a CNN reporter, who said, “You murdered the ambassador.”

“I was beside myself,” he told WND. “I said, ‘The blood of those Americans is on Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama’s hands.’”

Klein told WND that he joined the U.S. Marines when he was 17 and served in Vietnam as a non-commissioned officer. Later, he became a Marine Corp officer and had a major role in battle planning.

“I’m experienced, and I’m not a coward,” he said.

He said that he is tired of politicians sidestepping blame and wants to see Clinton and Obama forced to own up to their failures in Benghazi.

Klein said that despite what the White House wants Americans to believe, the blame for not protecting an American ambassador falls squarely on Obama.

“Hillary Clinton should have had an entire Marine regiment on the ground protecting those Americans,” said Klein.

“Their responsibility is to protect that ambassador. The fact that he died is evidence that they didn’t protect him,” he said. “If they can’t protect him, he shouldn’t have been there.”

Not long after Mohajer tied Klein to the film, the death threats started coming in, he said.

“One person phoning in a death threat identified my home address while threatening to kill me and my family,” Klein told WND. “The problem is, they had my address wrong.

“I called the police, and asked them to check on the poor family who now live at my old house.”

He said that although he hasn’t seen the film, he did watch the recent movie trailer for it and doesn’t find the information he saw “inaccurate.”

“My problem is when people, politicians in particular, apologize when truth is spoken about Islam,” Klein said.

Nonie Darwish, an ex-Muslim, recently expressed a similar view in a column for FrontPage Magazine.

“The problem with Islam is that Muslims riot and burn and kill those who repeat what is already in their scriptures,” she wrote.

She said that insulting Muhammad is an offense punishable by death, according to Shariah, even by saying something minor, no matter if it’s factual.

“When the life and acts of Muhammad were written and documented by Muslims, it was a source of pride for them; but in the 21st century it has become a source of shame, and now they cannot go back and remove what they already have written about the actions of Mohammed, so all they can do is riot burn and kill anyone who speaks about it,” Darwish said.

While Klein at least has daily contact with his FBI protectors, others like Darwish are left exposed when they speak the truth about Islam.

Speaking about Obama’s speech before the United Nations after the Benghazi attacks, Darwish wrote: “It was difficult to listen to the president of the United States’ recent statement at the United Nations, that, ‘The future must not belong to those who slander the prophet of Islam.’ The president of the United States was declaring to the world that critics of Muhammad are wrong; that they do not have a rightful cause; that they must not be heard, respected, taken seriously, and that they will have no future in America.

“Even though Obama’s threat was subtle – he did not use the word ‘death,’ but instead, ‘no future,’ – the statement sounds just as threatening, especially to former Muslims, who daily receive death threats from members of the ‘Religion of Peace’.”

She said: “After Obama’s U.N. speech, this author, and several other former Muslims, concluded that we do not feel safe under this administration. And now we are being told by the president of the United States to be silent about the religion we were born in and escaped from.”

Klein said he won’t stop telling the truth about who is at fault for the death of fellow Americans, and he won’t stop calling for Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama to be held responsible.

His broadcasts can be found at atvsat.com.

The filmmaker, identified as Nakoula Basseley Nakoula by the Los Angeles Times, was taken into custody at the time the controversy erupted over alleged probation violations. He’s been in jail since, and faces a Nov. 9 hearing.

A federal judge ordered him held, citing a “pattern of deception,” although the judge did not specify what he meant. The original case for which he got probation apparently involved bank fraud charges.

It was reported he was arrested in 2009 after federal agents searched his home on suspicion that he had engaged in a scheme to create fake identities and open credit card accounts.

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