(Fox News) — The battle of the sexes is alive and well. According to Pew Research Center, the share of women ages eighteen to thirty-four that say having a successful marriage is one of the most important things in their lives rose nine percentage points since 1997 – from 28 percent to 37 percent. For men, the opposite occurred. The share voicing this opinion dropped, from 35 percent to 29 percent.

Believe it or not, modern women want to get married. Trouble is, men don’t.

The so-called dearth of good men (read: marriageable men) has been a hot subject in the media as of late. Much of the coverage has been in response to the fact that for the first time in history, women have become the majority of the U.S. workforce. They’re also getting most of the college degrees. The problem? This new phenomenon has changed the dance between men and women.

Suzanne Venker and Phyllis Schlafly, the original “anti-feminist,” team up in a tour-de-force defense of traditional womanhood — don’t miss “The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know — and Men Can’t Say”

Venker’s upcoming book, released in February, is titled “How to Choose a Husband and Make Peace With Marriage.”

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