(WASHINGTON TIMES) In 2001, about 2.5 percent of youth medical records analyzed for a California study were found to have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. By 2010, that same analysis found the rate had increased to 3.1 percent.

That’s an overall jump in youth ADHD diagnoses of 24 percent in 10 years. Whites had the highest overall rates; in 2001, 4.7 percent of white children were diagnosed with the disorder compared with 5.6 percent in 2010.

But minorities saw the highest rate percentage rise. The rate, according to JAMA Pediatrics, which published the study, rose by 70 percent in black children and by 60 percent in Hispanics.

 

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