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WASHINGTON – Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., said he chose to run for the Senate because of the passage of Obamacare, which he called the “greatest assault on our freedom in my lifetime.”

Johnson, who owns a small business in Oshkosh, told the Atlas Society, a D.C.-based think tank, that he believes Americans are like a bunch of frogs in a pot of water.

“The pot of water is being brought up to a boil. I think we’re losing freedoms across the board,” Johnson said.

According to the senator, there are two tipping points that the American people must be wary of: the financial tipping point and the cultural tipping point.

The financial tipping point, he explained, is when the debt crisis hits a point where world creditors will look at the U.S. and no longer loan it any money.

He considers the cultural tipping point to be the dependency and entitlement mentality to which many Americans have fallen victim.

“When we shift to a culture where people are just saying, ‘I’m happy to sit back and let the government provide me with things,’ that becomes a very dangerous point in time for this country,” Johnson said.

Johnson also bemoaned the unsustainable growth of government.

“If you want to get to the root cause of the problem, it really is the size, the scope, the resulting cost of government,” Johnson said.

“That is the problem. If you’re looking for a metric that we have to measure, that we have to control, it’s government in relation to the size of our economy,” he explained.

“In 2009 it was 25 percent. It’s come down a little bit, but it’s on a path to go to 35 percent, and those are economic models that we understand simply are not sustainable.”

He also took issue with raising taxes on businesses.

He explained what he considers to be a myth – that businesses can afford to have their taxes raised.

He said that CEOs of large corporations are coming out in favor of higher taxes saying they can afford them, when in reality, this is likely because their boards of directors will increase their pay to make up for the additional taxes they’ll pay.

However, small- to medium-sized businesses don’t have the same luxury.

“What will end up happening is the small to medium-sized businesses … they’ll get taxed at 39.6 percent or more, while the CEOs of large corporations have been made whole salary-wise,” Johnson explained.

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