• Text smaller
  • Text bigger

There are a lot of things wrong with the media. The following is a perfect example.

I recently observed a pimple-faced sprat doing a commercial for a Florida television station’s evening news. The on-street reporter was beside himself because police, acting on a tip, had not only raided the wrong house – but said the raid ended in the death of the young man who resided there with his mother.

It was a tragic turn of events to be sure, but it was one that the young reporter was only too happy to exploit. Albeit the sheriff deputies had raided the wrong home, the one responsible for the fatal shooting was cleared of wrongdoing.

The reporter, waving a handful of papers, breathlessly shouted that he and his station were going to be doing special broadcasts that week pursuant to why police (in his opinion) were seldom charged with wrongdoing when they exercised deadly force.

The reporter claimed that 94 percent of police officers are found innocent when involved in deadly force with criminals. The idea that perhaps they were found innocent of wrongdoing was because they were, in fact, innocent of wrongdoing apparently escaped him.

The not-dry-behind-the-ears reporter trying to make a name for himself painted law enforcement as a marauding, out-of-control cabal running loose in the streets putting the citizenry at risk.

I’m not going to take time to cite statistics here, but I will say that everyone who lives in Florida knows full well that there are countless neighborhoods that are as violent and unsafe as there are anywhere in America. Drugs, drug-runners and gangs infest neighborhoods like cockroaches infest dirty kitchens. There are neighborhoods in Fort Lauderdale and Miami the police themselves are fearful of patrolling, and it doesn’t stop there.

Well did Dr. Karl Menninger speak when he penned “Whatever Became of Sin?” It seems that, for the likes of the reporter, wrongdoing is only committed by police.

The most violent murderers and criminals are lauded on liberal campuses. Convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal became a national celebrity after murdering Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner. He wrote books and was able to do interviews espousing his Black Nationalist mantra.

But nothing was said of the family Officer Faulkner left behind. There were no celebrities speaking out for his wife. There were no national and global campaigns to raise money for her. But Jamal remains a felon celebrity 32 years after murdering Officer Daniel Faulkner.

Violent drug dealers responsible for destroying lives and communities are extolled as somehow having become virtuous after they’re incarcerated.

Stanley “Tookie” Williams was the original co-founder of the Crips, one of the most violent street gangs in America. It is hard to quantify how many lives Williams was responsible for destroying through drugs, violence and human trafficking, but all of that took a backseat after his conviction and death sentence. Protests and marches were held on his behalf. So-called celebrities spoke out in his defense. Sadly, if not unsurprising, no one spoke out on behalf of the lives he ruined.

I am one of the only national columnists who still speaks out on behalf of New York undercover detectives James Nemorin and Rodney Andrews who were shot execution style by teenage gang members, whose gun-running gang the detectives were working undercover to take down.

As I wrote at the time of their murders in 2003, Al Sharpton didn’t lead protests, and Susan Sarandon didn’t condemn their murders.

We hear much about the battering rams used in sections of Los Angeles to gain entrance into drug-dealing centers, but the same rappers and so-called personalities who are quick to malign the police for their actions make no mention as to what made such extreme tactics necessary.

I would be the first to say that there are corrupt police and corrupt police departments. No police department was/is more corrupt and openly racist than Hilltown Township Police Department in Pennsylvania.

Even in the late 1990s, they were notorious for stopping drivers on highways and telling them that their kind weren’t welcome in the area if the drivers were black or Hispanic. They were notorious for stopping cars at night on fallacious driving violations, which led to the towing of vehicles that benefited another of their officers whose family owned the towing company. James G. Kane, one of their celebrated officers, was charged in 2005 for sexually assaulting a boy hundreds of times over a period of six years.

Also in Pennsylvania, police officers in the Perkasie Police Department were responsible for running a brothel.

But none of that referenced makes it permissible for reporters, so-called personalities and so-called leaders (Obama included) to malign police for doing their jobs.

Police frequently perform a thankless job. They receive attention only when it casts them in a bad light. But I for one am glad we have police who are willing to lay their lives on the line every day to protect us and keep our neighborhoods safe.

Given a choice of what I would rather live without – I could and would gladly live without the likes of the reporter who was so intent on savaging them.

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.