- WND - http://www.wnd.com -

Chuck Norris asks, 'What would Jesus eat?'

Chuck, I was sitting in church during Holy Week and found myself thinking, “I wonder what Jesus ate?” What do you know about his first century diet? – Teresa M. in Connecticut

That’s a great and timely question, especially during this Easter season.

With the growing concerns of nutrition and fitness, I get more and more questions about the health practices of great leaders like Jesus.

In his excellent book “What Would Jesus Eat?” Dr. Don Colbert does a great job of explaining what the Master would have eaten and drank during his day.

Colbert told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: “I thought I’d go back to the training manual – the Bible – and see what Jesus ate. Lo and behold, Jesus ate the healthiest diet ever developed, the Mediterranean diet.”

The Bible gives us some hint to the Savior’s health habits in verses like Luke 24:42, which tells how he ate broiled fish and honeycomb. Other passages describe how he consumed fish, bread and wine at the feeding of the multitudes, the wedding at Cana and Lord’s Supper.

Colbert, however, takes the search a step further, looking at the average diets of those living in first-century Israel.

Jesus was a Jew, so he would have followed Old Testament dietary laws. These laws were exacting:

Christian History magazine elaborated that at the two meals each day, bread, legumes, oil and dried or fresh fruit composed a typical meal. The light breakfasts – often flatbread, olives and cheese (from goats or sheep) – were carried to work and eaten at mid-morning.

Dinners were more substantial, consisting of vegetable (lentil) stew, bread (barley for the poor; wheat for the rich), fruit, eggs and/or cheese. Fish was a common staple (particularly as a relish for bread), but red meat was reserved for special occasions (probably eaten about once a month).

Locusts were a delicacy and reportedly tasted like shrimp. (Bet you thought I was going to say chicken! Of course, Jews then wouldn’t have even known they tasted like shrimp, since shrimp and all other crustaceans were “unclean.”)

Nazareth Village’s website elaborates: “Among the foods most likely available in first-century Nazareth (were):

Regarding the nutrition value of the above, Dr. Aaron Tabor highlighted the following points in his article on BeliefNet about some of the foods and drinks Jesus likely consumed:

All these nutrition tips are one more reminder of why Easter is another good season for health reflection, too.

But let us always remember to view our diets with the goal and from the vantage point of holistic health – what is good for body, mind and soul. Even Jesus Himself said, “Man shall not live on bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God.”

Write to Chuck Norris with your questions about health and fitness. Follow Chuck Norris through his official social media sites, on Twitter @chucknorris and Facebook’s “Official Chuck Norris Page.” He blogs at ChuckNorrisNews.blogspot.com.