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JERUSALEM – The Saudi national questioned by police in the investigation into the Boston Marathon attack shares the same last name as a major Saudi clan that includes scores of al-Qaida operatives.

Some in the clan are senior al-Qaida members while others are reportedly being held by the U.S. in the Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba.

Two Saudi nationals were reportedly injured in the bombings in Boston, with one, 20-year-old foreign student Abdul Rahman Ali Alharbi, initially put under armed guard at a hospital. Alharbi is reportedly studying in the U.S. on a student visa.

A large group of federal and state law enforcement agents reportedly raided Alharbi’s apartment in Revere, Mass.

CNN reported the search took place by consent, according to a federal law enforcement source, meaning no search warrant was needed

Now the Saudi embassy in Washington has said Alharbi was no longer under detention and is not a suspect in the bomb blasts.

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Saudi diplomat Azzam bin Abdel Karim reportedly visited Alharbi in the hospital.

Nail Al-Jubeir, a spokesman for the Saudi mission in Washington, stated that U.S. authorities told the embassy “no Saudi national was a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack and that the Saudi national in question was a witness, not a suspect.”

While it is not clear whether the Alharbi questioned as part of the marathon probe is a member of the well-known Saudi clan, his Facebook page, reviewed by WND, lists him as Facebook friends with at least seven other Alharbis, located in both Boston and in Saudi Arabia.

One of the Alharbis on his Facebook friends list, Ahmed Alharbi, is listed as a pharmacy technician at the Saudi Ministry of Health. Most others live in Riyadh.

The Alharbi clan has long been active in al-Qaida. Khaled bin Ouda bin Mohammed al-Harbi, for example, is a Saudi national who joined Osama bin Laden’s mujahadeen group in the 1980s. He reportedly became an al-Qaida member in the mid-1990s. He turned himself in to Saudi authorities in 2004 as part of an amnesty deal.

The BBC reported Khaled Alharbi was married to the daughter of al-Qaida’s number two, Ayman al-Zawahri. He reportedly appeared with bin Laden in a video praising the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Another top al-Qaida operative is Adel Radi Saqr al-Wahabi al-Harbi, a Saudi national identified by the State Department as “a key member of an al-Qaida network operating in Iran.”

The State Department has offered a multimillion-dollar reward for the capture of Abdel Alharbi, saying he is an Iran-based al-Qaida facilitator who serves as the deputy to Muhsin al-Fadhl, who runs al-Qaida’s Iran network.

On his website, former Palestinian Liberation Organization operative Walid Shoebat translated a list of the Saudi government’s 85 wanted al-Qaida members.

The list includes several members of the Alharbi clan:

  • Badr Saud Uwaid Al-Awufi Al-Harbi
  • Muhammad Atiq Uwaid Al-Awufi Al-Harbi
  • Khalid Salim Uwaid Al-Lahibi Al-Harbi
  • Raed Abdullah Salem Al-Thahiri Al-Harbi
  • Abdullah Abdul Rahman Muhammad Al-Harbi (leader)
  • Fayez Ghuneim Humeid Al-Hijri Al-Harbi

Shoebat also points out that several Alharbi clan members are being held by the U.S. government at Guantanamo Bay, including Salim Salman Awadallah Al-Saidi Al-Harbi, Majid Abdullah Hussein Al-Harbi, Muhammad Abdullah Saqr Al-Alawi Al-Harbi, Ghanem Abdul Rahman Ghanem Al-Harbi and Muhammad Atiq Uwaid Al-Awfi Al-Harbi.

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