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When a black mob attacked two reporters in Norfolk, Va., last year, the editor of the Virginian-Pilot newspaper said it was just a “street altercation” and he had no proof of racial motivation.

But even the most diehard denier of the epidemic of black mob violence around the country will find this case difficult to explain away: Three white men in Georgia were allegedly robbed and assaulted and almost killed in April by a group of black people, all because of the color of their skin.

At least that is what the victims told the local sheriff.

Most examples of black mob violence are not that neat. Reporters say they want some kind of written statement or spoken account from the perpetrators professing their racial animosity.

Absent that, they say even a tidal wave of evidence of mob violence committed almost exclusively by black people around the country does not show race had anything to do with anything. But thanks to WND readers, there is this:

In Virginia Beach last week, 40,000 black people rampaged through the Oceanfront at a gathering organized by black promoters, marketed to black schools and attended by people in buses from black fraternities. Everyone involved in the violence and lawlessness was black. The videos and eyewitness accounts and a subsequent town hall meeting remove any doubt about that.

This racial violence was just one of more than 500 episodes documented in “White Girl Bleed a Lot: The Return of Racial Violence and How the Media Ignore It.”

WND reader Carol Finnegan asked some reporters whether they had heard about this “race riot.” They were kind enough to be honest with her.

“Relax. It was a Spring Break riot,” said Seattle writer Geov Parrish. “Ask the beach towns in Florida how often stuff like this happens with drunk white students. (Answer: a lot.) The problem here isn’t race. It’s young adults with too much alcohol, and too many people encouraging such civic ‘parties’ because lots of money gets spent. It’s disgusting behavior no matter where it happens and who the crowd happens to include.”

Another journalist, who only identified himself as Michael from Analog Planet, had it all figured out.

“Race riot? Really? Sounds to me like some bad kids acting out. Sounds like you want to turn it into a ‘race riot.’ NBC covered it so why the right wing racist paranoia? Oh, right. Meanwhile it was about 150 bad kids out of 30-40,000. You’re tired. On to new things, like fag bashing (etc.)”

Casey Seiler, a reporter at the Times-Union of Albany, also told Finnegan race had nothing to do with it: “A riot made up primarily of black people wouldn’t be a ‘race riot’ any more than a post-championship riot at Penn State made up primarily of white people would be a ‘race riot.’”

Though curiously, these reporters and others never include videoed accounts of the riots they are referring to.

A reporter from the CBS affiliate in St. Louis said much the same thing: “The 40,000 are never described as all black but described as being mostly from black colleges,” said Carol Daniel. “No one is hiding anything.”

The problem is not that people are hiding things. But that some people are not looking.

Just as occasionally a reporter will be honest about his ideas, so will criminals. For this we have to thank John Fitzgerald Willis.

Willis lives with his fiancee and his mother in a town outside of Atlanta called Austell. Last month, he and his fiancee were partying with some friends when three white guys popped out of the nearby bushes and started walking up the road.

Says the Douglas County Sentinel: “Three Caucasian males came walking up the street, and Mr. Willis and his girlfriend began hollering at the men.”

The men told WSBTV “they were yelling, ‘this is our street, crackers. What you got in your pockets, crackers? This is our street.’”

It is not known how many people were at the party. But statements say Willis had a gun and he used it to pistol whip the men. The Sentinel reported “the statements were racial and that escalated and led Willis to attack the group. They were all left with visible injuries. In the process he did rob the men, taking the cell phones, wallets and keys and the items mentioned in the warrant.”

Sgt. John Sweat of the local sheriff’s department said the men were lucky they did not get killed.

Willis’ girlfriend said her boyfriend did not commit the crime and it was a case of mistaken identity.

They found him at home, asleep on the couch, sleeping with a loaded police-style 12 gauge shotgun, said the Sentinel.

He was charged with three counts of of robbery and assault and denied bail. Georgia does not have a hate crime law.

See several reports:

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