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Editor’s Note: The following report is excerpted from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin, the premium online newsletter published by the founder of WND. Subscriptions are $99 a year or, for monthly trials, just $9.95 per month for credit card users, and provide instant access for the complete reports.

BEIRUT, Lebanon – The battle for the Syrian city of al-Qusayr near the Syrian-Lebanese border was a major assault in an urban environment, in which observers say Hezbollah showed new techniques learned since the resistance group fought the Israelis in 2006, according to report from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

These observers say that the new urban warfare tactics will be useful in any future battle with the Israelis. In the 1990s, most Hezbollah fighting was in rural areas. In its 2006 fight with the Israelis, Hezbollah fought from mostly defensive positions in villages and towns.

According to sources, Hezbollah took the initiative in al-Qusayr beginning on May 20 to secure the city which constitutes a strategic crossroads for the Syrian rebels, their foreign fighter allies and the Syrian government.

Control over al-Qusayr means Hezbollah can halt the flow of logistics and fighters to the more northern cities of Homs and ultimately Aleppo, the business capital of Syria.

It also means that territory stretching from Damascus to the coast now will be in the hands of the Syrian government.

In taking the initiative, Hezbollah undertook a series of techniques that allowed it to use open radio communications but in a way the rebels would not understand. In effect, Hezbollah divided the city into operational sectors, code numbering locations and objectives that the rebels would not understand.

In addition, Hezbollah units moved in small numbers.

Sources say Hezbollah receives its training in Iran and in training camps in Lebanon’s Beka’a Valley. The training camps have configured small urban centers to give some sense of realism for the trainees.

Sources say that Hezbollah also may be preparing to fight to “liberate” Galilee and the Golan Heights, should Israel attack Lebanon.

They look upon their efforts as “defensive resistance” of defending Lebanon through unconventional warfare and not relying on the Lebanese army.

Sources say that if Hezbollah were to undertake an offensive effort into Israel should Lebanon be attacked, Hezbollah will seek to hold positions inside Israel rather than use the hit-and-run tactics of previous conflicts.

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