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Many people have expressed to me that Bill O’Reilly really nailed the “Black Community’s” problems in one of his Talking Points Memos recently.

The problem is his “Memo” amounted to little more than hollow words, chiefly because no white intellectual has the guts to say what really needs to be said.

O’Reilly’s words were observations presented by a person viewing things from a white intellectual’s perspective. It is observations from that perspective that have contributed massively to what I am convinced is the core problem.

Where exactly is this mythical “black community”? Can I find it on a map? Is it just outside of town? What’s the ZIP code? Give me a mailing address that is assigned to John Q. Black-Man at No. 1 Happy Street, Black Community, USA.

Racial assignations, as they have evolved over the years, stem from the mind and, I might add, astute observations of Lenin when he opined in the early 1900s that the first-generation former slaves in America were “ripe for revolution.” “It was Du Bois who, true to his Communist views, insisted on the use of ‘colored’ rather than ‘black’ because ‘colored’ could be used to include dark-skinned persons everywhere – which was of significant importance if socialism were to reach the greatest number of those intended.” (Read my column “How Communists co-opted black America,” Feb. 6, 2013)

In the early 1940s, Bayard Rustin, an avowed black Socialist, channeling Lenin, said, “Blacks are ripe for Communists.” Rustin was instrumental in the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which spawned Joseph Lowery and others. In 1965, after the signing of the Civil Rights Act, Rustin turned the attention of the black illuminati (i.e., Talented Tenth) from “protest” to the era of “politics.” Rustin became the honorary chairman of the Socialist Party of America in 1972 and the national chairman when the group changed its name to Social Democrats, USA (SDUSA) a short time later.

I contend that, by that time, the stage had been set for the culmination of the perfect elixir of militant black obduracy and contempt for America fueled by socialistic inculcation.

This elixir, when taken as it was prescribed, led blacks to embrace “Ethnicity over Nationality,” followed by a chaser of belligerent militancy and guilt-laden, political strategies resulting in where we are today in the 21st century. O’Reilly and those who view things through an intellectual matrix are clueless to the reality and damage they do every time they employ the assignation “black community.” It is even more segregating when the assignation “African-American Community” is used.

Blacks in the late 1960s were no longer singing songs like “Johnny B. Goode” by Chuck Berry and “Yakety Yak” by the Coasters. They were singing, “I’m Black and I’m Proud” by James Brown. In the 1970s, Gil Scott Heron was preaching through song that it was “Winter in America” and “When the Revolution Comes.” Blaxploitation films ushered in a new mantra of acceptable behavior whereby blacks were justified in using force to take what they wanted from the evil and oppressive white man.

The idea of pride in “Ethnicity over Nationality” was entrenched in college classrooms first and then high-school classrooms until it had reached a seamless transition from the cradle to the grave. Modernity for the purveyors of this mindset can only be achieved through socialism and the preaching that the white man’s government can only assuage their evil past injustices by making it unnecessary for blacks to have to compete and through an absence of culpability for any malevolent actions regardless of their legality.

Segregative language and color-coded references do nothing but calcify the idea that blacks are separate and inferior. Pompous intellectuals fail to realize that their use of the aforementioned serves only to confirm to blacks that they are a subset not included in the whole of America. It is an Erebusic form of veiled sedition whose end is a Westernized apartheid. References to African-American/black leaders, community and culture all suggest disaffection.

The inculcated adherence to segregative language and assignations has created a form of diplopia where everything is seen as color-coded when referencing blacks and then all others. It has spawned the damnable heterodoxy of lowered expectations and perceived insult pursuant to anything and anyone critical of aberrant behavior. Even more egregious, it has erected the image of a wall of inequality in the minds of most blacks that can only be climbed over by race-based affirmative action measures with no regard for qualifications or ability.

This may be a difficult concept for puffed-up intellectuals, program hosts, those who are trying to show that they are down with the struggle and the otherwise unthinking, but let there be no doubt what I am saying is true.

Until America understands and confronts the damage being caused by segregative language and self-segregative behavior, no amount of talking points as such are going to make a difference. Color-coded assignations serve only to divide us by portraying one group as oppressed and the other group as the oppressor.

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