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How dare they?

Why spend all that time, go through all the trouble and expense of having him tried in a court of law and judged by a jury of his peers? Why didn’t a group of “outraged citizens,” in retaliation for the crime he was accused of, don robes, drag him out and hang him from a tree?

Oh wait, wait. We used to have that, didn’t we? Regularly, “outraged citizens” known as the Ku Klux Klan, donned robes, dragged “guilty” blacks out to trees, sans a trial by a jury of their peers, and hanged them.

It was called “justice” by some, “lynching” by others.

If memory serves, all blacks, and a large majority of whites, objected to this. They felt citizens, regardless of race, creed or national origin, should not be denied access to our legal justice system and that there should be a proper adherence to the law, regardless of the charges.

Am I somehow misinterpreting the “outrage,” so called, by alleged “civil rights” groups and/or leaders?

It has often been said, “What you don’t know won’t hurt you.” But that’s not true. Ignorance is deadly! Be the first to get Ben Kinchlow’s “Black Yellowdogs” before its Sept. 10 release.

Are these “spokespersons” for black Americans calling for the abolition of the legal system? Are they implying we should only agree with, and abide by, those judgments that correspond to our assessment of the facts of the matter? If we disagree with the decisions of juries, should we immediately launch campaigns to negate their verdicts? Are said campaigns to be restricted solely to white-on-black crimes?

Could it be that our civil rights “leaders” and organizations like the NAACP are so lacking in civil rights challenges that something as contextually insignificant as the Zimmerman-Martin verdict demands their undivided attention and unified outrage?

Is this case to be accorded the same degree of commitment and unified response as the “not guilty” verdict handed down in the Emmett Till case in the 1950s? Depending on which report you accept, Emmett Till, raised in the North, while visiting some relatives, the Wrights, in the South, “whistled” at a white woman. According to one report, “Roy Bryant, Carolyn’s husband, and his half-brother, J. W. Milam, kidnap Emmett Till from Moses Wright’s home. They will later describe brutally beating him, taking him to the edge of the Tallahatchie River, shooting him in the head, fastening a large metal fan used for ginning cotton to his neck with barbed wire, and pushing the body into the river.

Is this the form of “justice” these angry blacks, outraged community activists, civil rights leaders and organizations like the NAACP desire for whites?

Since their primary concern, according to them, has little to do with race and everything to do with justice, then I am sure they will be equally outraged and proceed immediately to marching and demanding the U.S. government investigate and follow up on this data from the FBI:

Nearly half of the nation’s murder victims in 2005 were black, and the number of slain black men is on the rise. Most of the black murder victims were relatively young – between 17 and 29 – the Justice Department said in a study released in 2009.

While blacks are just 12.6 percent of the nation’s population, they’re roughly half of people murdered in this country each year. The vast majority of these killings are at the hands of other blacks. If that doesn’t shock you, maybe this will: More blacks were murdered in the U.S. in 2009 alone than all the U.S. troops killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to date. These figures do not include the more than 400 young black men slain in Chicago just since the Zimmerman-Martin saga began.

Can someone perhaps enlighten me as to why the national media, NAACP CEO Benjamin Jealous, Rev. Sharpton and other black community activists are not demanding an in-depth investigation into, and justice for, these black victims?

Maybe it is because the dead were blacks slain by blacks, as it appears that in every white/black scenario, blacks can do no wrong and must be exonerated. Right, O.J.?

 

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