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Editor’s Note: The following report is excerpted from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin, the premium online newsletter published by the founder of WND. Subscriptions are $99 a year or, for monthly trials, just $9.95 per month for credit card users, and provide instant access for the complete reports.

WASHINGTON – The head of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood has declared that his organization plans to create a “Free Egyptian Army” in an effort to reinstate Muslim Brotherhood-backed President Mohammad Morsi, who recently was removed in a coup by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, according to report from Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin.

Muslim Brotherhood Chairman Mohammad Badie who, like Morsi, already has been arrested for inciting violence, said that the Free Egyptian Army intends to “put their viewpoints into action” to return their elected president.

Badie’s announcement to create the Free Egyptian Army mirrors action by the Syrian opposition in creating the Free Syrian Army, which has been fighting against the embattled regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Badie has been jailed on allegations of inciting the violent demonstrations by Brotherhood supporters resulting in more than 100 deaths. His announcement suggests the prospect of increased confrontations with the Egyptian military, leading to greater instability and the prospect of civil war itself, analysts say.

The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood renounced violence some 30 years ago when it entered into mainstream politics, even though its goal remains to Islamize the Egyptian society by promoting Islamic, or Shariah law.

The Brotherhood has sought to do so through the concept of “vanguard” by creating a political elite and making alliances with opposition parties and by running for parliament, and then in June 2012, for the presidency, which it won.

Egypt’s interim President Adli Mansour, who was the prosecutor-general before being appointed by the military to take over from Morsi, has promised to fight those driving the nation “towards chaos.”

“Some want a bloody path,” he said. “We will fight a battle for security until the end.”

Gehad El-Haddad, a senior Muslim Brotherhood adviser, said his organization’s supporters were “willing to die” to have Morsi reinstated.

He said the Brotherhood was determined to reverse the military overthrow of Egypt’s first democratically elected president.

“We have our own belief in the democratic system and we are willing to die for it,” El-Haddad said. “We might end up on the streets facing military bullets tearing through our flesh but the Egyptian people will face a 60-year cycle of a new military dictatorship that will rob their freedom with short-term promises.”

El-Haddad was referring to the military takeover by the late Col. Bamal Abdel Nasser who led a coup in the 1950s and was succeeded to the presidency by other military members, Anwar Sadat and Hosni Mubarak. Mubarak was removed in 2011 at the beginning of the Arab Spring, a movement sweeping the Middle East at the time.

“Our children will suffer the consequences, not us,” El-Haddad said. “The military has to be pushed back into the barracks or the only alternative is killing.”

The Muslim Brotherhood is the largest Islamist group in Egypt today.

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