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While there are some Republicans who see undocumented immigrants – or illegal aliens – as a help to the nation’s economy for the jobs they do, there are others who believe they are a significant factor in raising unemployment, depressing wages and taking jobs from Americans.

But another factor is at play in Washington’s current arguments over immigration, illegal aliens, and the Democrats’ plan for amnesty for millions – the future of the GOP.

“About half or so of the [House Republican] Caucus understand we are on suicide watch over the Republican Party,” said Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, following a caucus meeting Wednesday.

After all, it was Eliseo Medina, an “immigration reform” activist and honorary chair of Democratic Socialists of America, who said he would expect two out of three of those given amnesty would vote Democrat.

That could mean upwards of eight million or more Democrat voters spread across southern states that traditionally have voted Republican.

In 2009, Medina stated, “We reform the immigration laws, it puts 12 million people on the path to citizenship and eventually voters. Can you imagine if we have, even the same ratio, two out of three? If we have eight million new voters … We will be creating a governing coalition for the long term, not just for an election cycle.”

King’s comments came after the House Republican Caucus finished a much-anticipated closed door meeting Wednesday, a meeting that  would make Wednesday “the most important day for immigration reform.”

According to reports from attendees, the House remains split on the issue. A number of members would like to see some DREAM Act-type legislation, which provides tuition subsidies for children of illegal aliens. Some also wanted more aliens available for agricultural work. Half the caucus opposes amnesty.

According to CNN, House Speaker John Boehner warned Republicans that they would face political attacks if they failed to deal with the issue.

Rep. Paul Ryan said that doing nothing was not an option.

Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, added, “We don’t want the White House to hope that we fail to make it a campaign issue. House Republicans want to do this on our terms, and not on the Senate’s terms and not on the White House terms.”

Democrats want the House to vote on the Senate bill, which guarantees “a path to citizenship.”

However, House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp, R-Mich., announced Wednesday evening that the Senate version was unconstitutional because bills with tax provisions must originate from the House of Representatives. Therefore, the Senate bill could not be considered by the House, he said.

As WND reported earlier, the American Communist Party developed the “path to citizenship” agenda for illegals long ago, and amnesty remains a top legislative priority.

Conservatives are resisting it. King said, “Once you start down that line, you’re destroying the rule of law.”

Rep. Michelle Bachman added, “The real issue is amnesty. The whole game is about legalization, the status of legalization.”

And while media and the political establishment keep referring to the “11 million undocumented,” the number is almost certainly magnitudes greater, perhaps 30 million or more. Democrats are salivating at the prospects of all those new Democrat voters creating a “governing coalition for the long term.”

According to a report from Associated Press, House Republicans think the solution is a step-by-step approach, fixing one problem at a time, rather than the vast and sweeping plan through which Barack Obama wants to accomplish his goals.

And while former President George W. Bush called for American to be a “lawful” and “welcoming” society, Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kan., said, “We care what people back home say, not what some former president says.”

House Republicans have explained the specific-issue scenario is needed because the White House simply “cannot be trusted” to do what it says.

The Obama plan would begin the citizenship for millions immediately, while promising vague border security efforts at some point in the future. The House Judiciary Committee, on the other hand, already has approved at least four specific proposals to enforce security, such as mandatory verification of employees’ legal status.

Huelskamp took to Twitter to express what he really thinks: “Most House Rs agree w/most Senate Rs and Americans. Trusting Obama w/border security is like trusting Bill Clinton w/your daughter”

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