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NYC's "Go Topless Day" in 2012/Photo: Katie Sokoler/Gothamist

Jugs. Tatas. Cans. Melons. Knockers. Hooters. Cha-chas. Rack.

If you find these slang words used to describe female breasts offensive, imagine your reaction to seeing naked women parading around in public, in full view of anyone nearby, including children.

Thousands of topless women in cities across America and around the world are hitting the streets Sunday in observance of “Go Topless Day,” a 24-hour period in which women are encouraged to walk around shirtless, exposing their naked breasts.

The protests are held each year in late August to commemorate the date in 1920 when women were given the right to vote in the U.S.

This year marks the sixth anniversary of “Go Topless Day,” which is organized by a group of UFO believers called the Raelians.

Members believe humans were created by advanced scientists known as the “Elohim,” and that not allowing women to go topless is an insult to the aliens’ artistry.

“As long as men are allowed to be topless in public, women should have the same constitutional right. Or else, men should have to wear something to hide their chests,” proclaimed Nadine Gary, a Raelian priestess and “Go Topless Day” organizer.

Men who support the group’s mission are asked to cover their chests with pasties or bras.

Boston, Pittsburgh, Vancouver, San Francisco, Asheville, Los Angeles, Miami, Detroit, Denver, Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C., are among 49 cities playing host to the protests, up from 30 last year.

Under Massachusetts state law, “nudity” is defined as the following:

“Uncovered or less than opaquely covered human genitals, pubic areas, the human female breast below a point immediately above the top of the areola, or the covered male genitals in a discernibly turgid state. For purposes of this definition, a female breast is considered uncovered if the nipple or areola only are covered.”

“Men can take their shirts off anywhere they want. Why can’t women? It’s simple discrimination against half of the population. Is it not? It seems that way to me,” said Stacey, who is the spokesperson for the Massachusetts chapter of ToplessEquality.com.

“This is something I have always felt was wrong, that women can’t go topless and men can, and I would love to see it happen in Boston,” she told Boston Daily.

NYC's "Go Topless Day" in 2012/Photo: Katie Sokoler/Gothamist

Pennsylvania law defines indecent exposure as “displaying one’s genitals in any place where other persons are present and the behavior is likely to offend, affront or alarm.”

“I have to look, but it doesn’t seem like we’ll be able to allow this,” Pittsburgh’s Public Safety Director Mike Huss told the Tribune-Review.

“We want women to examine how they feel about all women’s issues,” Donna Alexander, the group’s spokeswoman told the paper.

“From this, maybe they’ll look to the workplace, or how they run their homes. We’re a springboard for any rule or law women feel isn’t represented by their own ideals.”

It’s legal to go topless in North Carolina, but in 2011 a counter protest to “Go Topless Day” was organized by two former elected officials.

Former Asheville Vice Mayor Carl Mumford and former Republican Party County Chair Chad Nesbitt claimed their outcry against the march fell upon deaf ears.

The men called the topless event “child sexual abuse” and filed a complaint with the department of social services alleging children were exposed to obscene sexual displays.

“We have fought this every step of the way, including asking the county commissioners, mayor, city council members and even the local school board to support the resolution and ordinance [blocking the event], but we were either told ‘no’ or faced resistance from all of them,” Mumford said.

This year, the men are going after the police. Topless sex play in front of children is a felony in the state, but they say police have repeatedly failed to enforce existing N.C. laws on sexual performance in public spaces and in front of children.

Mumford and his supporters have scores of photographs of such lewd behavior at past “Go Topless Day” rallies.

“Operation Cop Watch” will offer cash prizes for photos that document police failure to protect innocent children at Sunday’s event.

Women in New York City won’t be arrested for roaming the city topless, reports the New York Times.

The state’s highest court ruled more than two decades ago that baring one’s chest in public — for noncommercial activity — is perfectly legal for a woman, as it is for a man.

The city’s 34,000 police officers were instructed earlier this year that if they encounter a woman in public who is shirtless but obeying the law, they should not arrest her.

The policy shift comes after several years of litigation and protest.

If it’s illegal for women to go topless in public in any particular city, they are encouraged to dress within the limits of the law by wearing pasties, body paint, or bikini tops.

But even if it’s legal, the group warns women and their male supporters they still risk arrest for “disorderly conduct” or “public lewdness” related to their nude display.

“I don’t understand these repressive laws,” the Raelian priestess Gary told the Huffington Post. “Is it because of this myth of original sin? Because women have somehow tempted men?”

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