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Ben Kinchlow

By Scott Greer

Ben Kinchlow, the well-known religious leader, political commentator and star of “The 700 Club,” has issued a strong rebuke to President Obama over a planned speech to commemorate the MLK’s March on Washington anniversary.

According to an article published in the Washington Post this week, Obama is planning to speak on how achieving economic equality is the best way to attain “racial justice.”

Kinchlow said it’s simply not the government’s job to meddle with economic “equality.”

“It is not the government’s responsibility to rectify the economic situation in this country, it’s the government responsibility to make sure that there is no legal barriers to economic progress and there are no legal barriers to economic progress in the United States!” Kinchlow told WND on Tuesday.

“We need to celebrate what we’ve done and not just keep harping on all things that are incorrect and improper,” Kinchlow elaborated.

The ordained minister believes that the reason for the economic disparity between races in this country is not due to institutionalized barriers, but has more to do with the high rate of African-Americans dropping out of school.

“One of the reasons we don’t have economic strength in the African-American community is because we have so many African-American young men dropping out of school and not getting educated,” Kinchlow stated. “That’s why we have the problems we are facing, not because of institutionalized racism.”

The details of Obama’s speech were revealed to the Washington Post by his senior adviser, Valerie Jarrett. She told the newspaper how Obama wants to convey in his speech how racial equality will require the government to take steps regarding economic “equality.”

“He wants to create opportunity and to make sure the level playing field is ready for everybody,” Jarrett said. “If you look at poverty or unemployment, they disproportionately affect people of color. People who don’t have health insurance are disproportionately of color. There is inevitably an overlap in addressing racial equality at the same time you’re trying to create economic empowerment.”

Obama is set to give his speech from the steps on the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Kinchlow’s new book “Black Yellowdogs”, to be released by WND Books on Sept. 10, exposes explosive historical facts that black leaders, revisionist historians, and left-leaning professors have deliberately hidden or made little effort to ascertain.

Kinchlow, once qualified as a “Black Yellowdog” (“a black American who consistently votes Democratic, no matter the issue or candidate”), targets the flawed concept of voting in blind faith for any party or candidate, declaring it “a deadly game of follow the leader.”

As someone who “personally experienced the institutionalized segregation and hardcore racism of the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s,” Kinchlow refuses, as Justice Clarence Thomas suggested, “to have my ideas assigned to me.”

Kinchlow dissects the seismic shift in voting patterns of black Americans from the first election where they voted 99 percent Republican in 1876 to 90 percent Democratic in 2000.

Beginning with the origins of slavery in the new United States of America, Kinchlow corrects the grievous errors of “TV pundits, ivory towered intellectuals, and ‘civil rights leaders’” in their depiction of the Founding Fathers as “bigots, rakes, and hypocrites” through the end of nearly “100 years of suffering for blacks who would be born in America” after the end of the Civil War.

Kinchlow is known throughout the world as the long time co-host of “The 700 Club,” and the host of “The International Edition of The 700 Club.” Kinchlow served 13 years in the Air Force.

He was ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Kinchlow founded Americans For Israel, serves as co-host of the Front Page Jerusalem radio show, and is a commentary contributor at WND. Kinchlow is the author of several books including “Plain Bread” (an autobiography) and “You Don’t Have To If You Don’t Want To.”

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