• Text smaller
  • Text bigger

In the wake of the military coup in Egypt earlier this month, media reports frequently recounted the violent clashes between the military and supporters of the ousted Muslim Brotherhood regime of Mohammed Morsi. What is not often reported, however, is the brutal treatment of Coptic Christians, usually at the hands of the Muslim Brotherhood.

“Members of the Muslim Brotherhood have taken their anger out specifically on Christians because many Christians wanted the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi out of power and were speaking out, including the Coptic pope,” said Jerry Dykstra, spokesman for Open Doors USA, one of the leading organizations reaching out to the persecuted Christian church.

“So in the last three weeks or so, we’ve seen Christians targeted, especially a Coptic priest who was killed in northern Sinai. An Egyptian businessman was killed and beheaded in northern Sinai. Churches were also burned and Christians were driven out of their communities,” Dykstra told WND. “Whenever things get bad, Christians are almost doubly in the spotlight and the crosshairs and we’re seeing this now as things get even worse.”

Dykstra says Coptics had good reason to want the Morsi regime removed from power.

“They were being more marginalized than ever before. Of course, they had no protection from anybody. They were sort of on their own, so there was more violence against Christians. There was more use of the blaspheming laws. There was real concern of the Muslim Brotherhood putting together Sharia law down the road,” said Dykstra, who saw the major dilemmas facing Christians when he was in Egypt last year.

“It was very hard for Egyptian Christians to see their family members and many of their friends from their churches that fled the country. It’s a very hard position to be in.”

Despite the grave danger facing believers in Egypt, Dykstra does see political and spiritual upsides there. He says Christians are finally getting a bit of their voice back inside the government.

“Last week, there were three Christians appointed by the new interim cabinet among 33 that were appointed. So that’s a good step,” he said.

On the spiritual side, repressed believers saw their faith grow as a result of the government restrictions.

“Last fall, there was a tremendous seminar. Thousands and thousands of people in the desert came together and prayed and worshiped the Lord and many came to Christ. So even in the midst of despair and violence, you see the Lord working.”

Open Doors USA is also sending relief to the beleaguered believers in Syria, who are caught between a brutal regime and a rebel alliance that is even more hostile to Christians.

“There is just a despair among many of the people. They have been displaced from their homes and children from their schools,” said Dykstra. “We did a report last week that said of the 100,000 killed, five to seven thousand of them have been children. We also know that millions of children are displaced inside and outside of the country.”

 

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.