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By Scott Greer

Bestselling author and renown investigative reporter Jack Cashill believes there are strong parallels between the Trayvon Martin case in Florida and the Duncan, Okla., case where black teens are accused of killing Australian baseball player Christopher Lane.

“The drugs, the racial animosity, the violence, the attachment to the hip hop culture – if Trayvon was the son of Barack Obama, they were his brothers,” Cashill commented to WND. “They were on the same track that Trayvon was.”

He was referencing Obama’s comment that he made in the Trayvon Martin case, that pushed the conflict into the national political scene. Obama said, “If I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon.”

Cashill has a new book coming out in just a few weeks, Sept. 1, in ebook form, and on Oct. 29 in hardback, “If I Had a Son: Race, Guns, and the Railroading of George Zimmerman,” that covers the Trayvon Martin case and how it escalated racial tensions across America.

Two teenage African-Americans are charged with the murder of Lane, and another teen faces charges for his involvement in the brutal slaying. Lane was shot in the back while jogging through his neighborhood and his death has prompted an international outcry.

Cashill believes that one of the accused killers, James Edwards, 15, was driven by racial animosity towards whites, as evidenced by tweets he sent out that included: “90% of white ppl are nasty. #HATE THEM” and “Ayeee I knocked out 5 woods since Zimmerman court! :)”

Woods is a derogatory term for white people.

“He’s clearly motivated by race, as have been hundreds of assaults by young black guys of white people across the country,” Cashill explained.

The recent spate of black mob violence that Cashill is referring to is documented in “White Girl Bleed A Lot: The Return of Racial Violence to America and how the Media Ignore It,” written by WND contributor Colin Flaherty.

Cashill believes that the firestorm resulting from the verdict of the trial of George Zimmerman, who was acquitted by a jury, influenced the actions of these young men and caused them to murder an innocent white man.

“I think there is no doubt that the furor surrounding the Trayvon Martin case…and given a green light by the Justice Department and Barack Obama directly, has led to an increase in the attacks of blacks on whites across America,” Cashill stated.

He dismisses the notion that the tragedy was caused by the availability of guns in America, as certain Australian politicians and American media personalities have claimed. Instead it was caused, in Cashill’s opinion, by the national media that has promoted the idea that Zimmerman got away with murder.

“The national media, in the wake of the Trayvon Martin shooting, virtually licensed them to go out and do things like this. If we’re going to blame the Gabby Gifford shooting on Sarah Palin, which is totally bogus, here there is some real responsibility that has to be accepted by the national and the Obama administration, including Obama himself,” Cashill commented.

Cashill hopes that this tragedy breaks through the media silence on rising racial violence in America and that the general public will become more aware of this growing epidemic.

“This case has some potential to expose this ongoing black-on-white violence in the wake of the Trayvon Martin case because of the international element of it. Once the prime minister of Australia speaks out, the media are almost forced to say something on it,” Cashill elaborated.

In “If I Had A Son,” Cashill tells the inside story of how, as the result of a tragic encounter with troubled 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, the media turned Zimmerman into a white racist vigilante, “the most hated man in America.”

“If I Had A Son” tells how for the first time in the history of American jurisprudence, a state government, the U.S. Department of Justice, the White House, the major media, the entertainment industry and the vestiges of the civil rights movement conspired to put an innocent man in prison for the rest of his life.

All that stood between Zimmerman and lifetime internment were two folksy local lawyers, their aides, and some very dedicated citizen journalists, most notably an unpaid handful of truth seekers at the blogging collective known as the Conservative Treehouse.

“If I Had A Son” takes an inside look at this unprecedented battle formation.

It also tells the story of the six stalwart female jurors who ignored the enormous pressure mounting around them and preserved America’s judicial system.

In the wake of the verdict, skeptics in the Martin camp claimed that the state of Florida did not play to win. In the course of his research, Cashill came across some startling evidence which suggests that those skeptics may indeed be right.

“If I Had A Son” is the one and only comprehensive look at the most politically significant trial in decades. What George Zimmerman learned in the course of his ordeal is that although he supported Obama, and lobbied for Obama, and voted for Obama at least once, in the final analysis he did not look enough like Obama to be his son, and that made all the difference.

See Cashill’s comments on his investigation results:

First video:

Second video:

Third video:

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