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In Jackson, Miss., a bass fisherman who was participating in a professional fishing tournament was gunned down by a hoodie-wearing, 17-year-old black youth in a case that has become a sobering reminder of violence in America.

The case is noteworthy because the suspect’s description is almost the same as that for Trayvon Martin the night he was shot and that it took place in the city that just elected a radical, black separatist, Chokwe Lumumba, as its mayor.

Jack Cashill, author of “If I Had a Son: Race, Guns, and the Railroading of George Zimmerman,” believes this case highlights a lot of the troubles that currently are plaguing the nation and reveals the biases of the mainstream media, particularly in how media outlets referred to Trayvon as a “child” while the Jackson murder suspect is not, despite the two being similar.

“The accused killer is the same age and race as Trayvon Martin and yet, in no article that I’ve seen has anyone described him as a ‘child.’ He would have become a child, however, and his hoodie a symbol, if Johnny Johnson [the slain fisherman] had managed to defend himself from attack as George Zimmerman did. Strange world,” Cashill explained.

Cashill also took notice of the fact that the mayor of Jackson holds radical views and how high-profile incidents, such as this murder, could hurt his chances of running a safe and prosperous city.

“Jackson has the most radical mayor of any city of size in America. A good way for the mayor not to attract new business is to let your tourists get murdered. I’d vote for Mayor Lumumba if he would stand up to the thugs and address the real problems his city faces,” Cashill stated.

WND earlier reported on Lumumba’s past associations and radical views he has expressed. Lumumba was at one a time a leader of an organization known as the Republic of New Afrika that sought the creation of an independent, black nation out of five Southeastern states. He has earned high praise from the official newspaper of the Nation of Islam for his stances and past actions.

Shaun Brown, who is the suspect in the murder of Jimmy Johnson, is being held on the charge of capital murder. According to police, he has confessed to committing the crime.

Johnson was staying at a Motel 6 with his wife when he was murdered. He was reportedly responding to a claim that his boat was being robbed when he was shot. His wife was not hurt in the violence that ensued.

He was positioned in 11th place in the Bass Pro Shops Bassmaster Central Open when he was killed.

In “If I Had A Son”, Cashill tells the inside story of how, as the result of a tragic encounter with troubled 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, the media turned Zimmerman into a white racist vigilante, “the most hated man in America.”

“If I Had A Son” tells how for the first time in the history of American jurisprudence, a state government, the U.S. Department of Justice, the White House, the major media, the entertainment industry and the vestiges of the civil rights movement conspired to put an innocent man in prison for the rest of his life.

All that stood between Zimmerman and lifetime internment were two folksy local lawyers, their aides, and some very dedicated citizen journalists, most notably an unpaid handful of truth seekers at the blogging collective known as the Conservative Treehouse.

“If I Had A Son” tells the story, too, of the six stalwart female jurors who ignored the enormous pressure mounting around them and preserved America’s judicial system.

In the wake of the verdict that acquitted Zimmerman of charges from Martin’s shooting, skeptics in the Martin camp claimed that the state of Florida did not play to win. In the course of his research, Cashill came across some startling evidence which suggests that those skeptics may indeed be right.

“If I Had A Son” is the one and only comprehensive look at the most politically significant trial in decades.

See Cashill’s comments on his investigation of the Martin case:

First video:

Second video:

Third video:

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