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Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Ken Cuccinelli

WASHINGTON — It would be like accusing Obama of opposing Obamacare.

Democrats are apparently telling voters in Virgina that gubernatorial candidate Ken Cuccinelli supports Obamacare, even though the Republican was the first attorney general in the country to file a lawsuit against the health-care law.

Why would Democrats make such an accusation?

To keep conservative voters from going to the polls Tuesday, according to state Republicans.

Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe is already mired in scandals and his once double-digit lead in the Virginia gubernatorial race is virtually gone, down to just two points in a poll released over the weekend.

So now, he is resorting to dirty tricks, according to a Virginia lawmaker.

Scott Lingamfelter, a Republican member of the Virginia House of Delegates, said he received a robo-call on Sunday claiming that Cuccinelli supports Obamacare.

He also said the call claimed vehemently pro-life Cuccinelli supported taxpayer financing for abortions.

“They are shameless in their lies,” he wrote on his Facebook page.

“I guess they are trying to suppress GOP voters,” Lingamfelter concluded.

Lingamfelter said the recording announced it was paid for by the Democratic Party of Virginia.

He pleaded with Virginians to “understand that the party that wants Terry McAuliffe to be your governor will flat lie about anything!”

Lifenews reports, “[T]he calls may have been going on for a while, as Virginia resident Shirley Widlacki wrote on Twitter in early October that she received a similar robo-call with false claims about Cuccinelli.’

WND called the Democratic Party of Virginia for comment. Press Secretary Ashley Bauman said she’d been “on the road” for a while. She directed the inquiry to another staff member and gave WND an email address. WND has not received a response.

When WND contacted the Cuccinelli campaign for reaction, a representative provided a press release from the Republican Party of Virginia, which read, “It’s a despicable attempt at voter suppression. It’s shameless, it’s dishonest, and it’s utterly unsurprising.”

Referendum on Obamacare

Obamacare has become the top issue for Cuccinelli in the Virginia gubernatorial race as it heads for a neck-and-neck finish.

In an op-ed column published in Politico on Monday, Cuccinelli portrayed the election as a referendum on Obamacare.

“Virginia can send Washington a message that we oppose Obamacare with our votes on Tuesday.

“Virginians who oppose Obamacare can vote for me, and Virginians who want to see Obamacare grow further can vote for McAuliffe,” he wrote.

“This is the first chance for people to speak clearly at the ballot box about the impact this law is having on their lives and on our economy,” Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said Monday while campaigning for Cuccinelli.

“That health care law will only get worse,” he added. “The website is just the tip of the iceberg.”

President Obama seems to be running away from his own health-care law, not even mentioning Obamacare once during his entire 21-minute speech while campaigning for McAuliffe on Sunday.

Democrats seem to be hoping Republicans will get more blame for the government shutdown than Democrats will get for the Obamcare disaster.

Referring to the shutdown, McAuliffe said, “He (Cuccinelli) stood with the tea party and not with Virginia families.”

“Can you even imagine if Ted Cruz, Ken Cuccinelli and the tea party ran the Virginia government?” he wondered.

The president literally tried to scare up votes for his candidate, telling supporters, “Nothing makes me more nervous than when my supporters start feeling too confident, so I want to put the fear of God in all of you,” Obama said.

And campaigning for McAuliffe Monday, Vice President Joe Biden tried to paint Cuccinelli’s traditional values as old fashioned, warning that tea-party views are “out of the ’30s and ’40s and ’50s.”

Follow Garth Kant on Twitter @DCgarth

 

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