(NYTIMES) — BRUSSELS — Fear of rising anti-Semitism in Europe has prompted nearly a third of European Jews to consider emigration because they do not feel safe in their home country, according to a detailed survey of Jewish perceptions released Friday by a European Union agency that monitors discrimination and other violations of basic rights.

The survey, by the bloc’s Fundamental Rights Agency, focused on eight countries that account for more than 90 percent of Europe’s Jewish population and found that “while member states have made sustained efforts to combat anti-Semitism, the problem is still widespread.”

The Vienna-based agency, in a lengthy report on its findings, did not reach any conclusions about the cause of a perception among European Jews of rising bias. But the results of its survey suggest that prejudices traditionally associated with far-right nationalist political groups like those that collaborated with the Nazis during World War II have now spread to other segments of society and are increasingly driven by conflict in the Middle East rather than homegrown bigotry.

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