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Now that everyone understands Barack Obama won re-election by fooling enough of the people enough of the time by telling a series of lies, it’s an opportune moment to look ahead for a sneak peek at how Democrats will spin American voters next year.

It’s not hard to predict. In fact, it has already begun. Both Obama and Joe Biden have floated amazingly false political claims lately to see if they might get caught.

As usual, the media gave them both a pass.

What is the Democrat big lie for 2014?

I predict it will be that Obama and his party are responsible for historic deficit reduction.

I know, it sounds preposterous, right?

But it has already begun.

Here’s how the White House itself makes the case for Obamanomics: Officials make the case that Obama has cut the deficit more than in half since 2009.

Obama has made the claim.

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Biden made the claim more recently, saying his administration had reduced the deficit it inherited by 50 percent since 2008, the largest deficit reduction since World War II. He also claimed the Obama administration had reduced the national debt over the next 10 years by $2.5 trillion.

To date, Republicans have done little to counter the assertions, which suggests to me the creative accounting techniques being used to bolster these claims will be accepted as the political gospel in 2014.

But what’s the truth?

The truth is Obama has been responsible for the five largest deficits in the nation’s history.

The truth is they use lower interest rate assumptions to show budget deficit reduction from the 2013 budget to the 2014 budget. But the rates they use for inflation and interest rates are way below reasonable levels given their optimistic projections for growth and lower unemployment.

Just like with Obamacare promises in an election year, perception is more important than reality.

Here are some more hard facts:

  • The 2008 deficit was $459 billion. The 2013 deficit equals $759 billion. No matter how you slice it, that’s an increase of $300 billion. (These numbers, by the way, come from the Office of Management and Budget.)
  • The 2013 debt is $17.1 trillion. The projected debt in 2023 is $25.8 trillion. That reflects a 10-year increase of $8.7 trillion. (Again, the numbers are from the OMB.)

Maybe you’re wondering how Obama and the Democrats can spin these numbers into historic deficit reduction?

It’s easy if you’re not challenged. And, so far, the disinformation campaign seems to be working. The Republicans are not holding the claims up to ridicule. Neither are the media.

So why wouldn’t Obama and the Dems use this claim as their talking point in 2014? What else can they do – talk about the success of Obamacare?

It’s an old trick. Bill Clinton and the Democrats used it successfully in 1996, taking credit for cuts in spending initiated by the Republican takeover of the Congress. It worked.

Will it work again?

Can Obama get away with claiming to have reduced the deficit by 50 percent when it actually increased by 65 percent?

Can the Democrats get away with claiming to have reduced the national debt when it is actually projected to increase by more than 50 percent?

What do you think?

Who is going to call them on it?

If not the Republicans, who?

If not the media, who?

It’s a fact that the Big Lie works. It was Adolf Hitler who famously wrote in “Mein Kampf” that if one used a lie so “colossal,” no one would believe that someone “could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously.” It’s how Hitler came to power and mesmerized the German republic.

The Big Lie is alive and well and working in American politics today.

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