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By Willie Shields

The smartest people in the world work at Google.

So if Google had a problem with the way WND and Colin Flaherty write about black mob violence, it should have taken one of its brainiacs about half a second to show they are wrong.

But they can’t. Because WND and Flaherty are not.

Instead Google is trying to inhibit these stories from being published by banning Google ads from them.

Maybe this censorship was just a knee-jerk reaction and Google has not tried to prove Flaherty wrong, yet. I’m not Google-smart, but I’ll tell you exactly how to do it. In his book and articles, Flaherty documents more than 1,000 cases of black mob violence in more than 100 cities.

For example, just a few months ago near Rochester, Flaherty wrote about 500 black people fighting, attacking police and creating mayhem at a movie theater. All Google has to do to shut Flaherty up is to say something like the following: “The people involved in the fighting and chaos were Amish, not black.”

Or show that whites or Asians or Eskimos are doing the same thing in the same proportion.

That would shut him up right away.

Multiply the Rochester example by hundreds, and that is what Flaherty documents around the country. There are tons and tons of opportunities to prove him wrong.

It should be easy: Even the presence of a few white or Asian or Eskimo people at these episodes of black mob violence would do it. Go ahead, Google, give it a go. We’ll wait.

Same with the Knockout Game: Flaherty has been writing about this for three years, documenting incidents all over the country. By an overwhelming amount, most of the perpetrators of the Game are black. Most of the victims are not.

Easy to show he is wrong about that, too: You are Google, for crying out loud. If you can’t show he is wrong, who can?

I understand the trouble Google is having. Flaherty does not give Google lots of opportunities. He does not do the big Causes or Solutions. Neither does he waste time apologizing for noticing what Google hopes everyone will ignore.

He thinks the criminals should be the ones apologizing. Not him.

Flaherty once did a story that got a black man out of prison by showing he was unjustly convicted. That story was all over NPR, the Los Angeles Times and other liberal outlets. He was a hero.

Now, some of these same folks say he is a goat for writing “White Girl Bleed a Lot: The Return of Racial Violence to America and How the Media Ignore it.” They don’t like how he is reporting what they pretend does not exist: an epidemic of black mob violence and black-on-white crime.

Google would not be the first to try and shut these stories down by proving Flaherty wrong. The big liberal flagship Salon once gave it a go in Minneapolis. Here’s their best shot: “Flaherty says ‘a group of black people attacked a mobile alcoholic beverage cart in Minneapolis,’ but there’s no such thing as ‘mobile alcoholic beverage carts’ in Minneapolis.”

Of course there are. But that’s it?

That was it.

Even Salon readers thought that was flimsy, including Estaban Moberly:

“I haven’t read the book, nor do I have any desire to. Right-wing screed books are a dime a dozen. However, I live in Champaign, Illinois – home of the University of Illinois. For the past several years, we have had an onslaught of groups of young black men assaulting white men at random. They ambushed and beat students on the campus and people in their own yards. These victims were not typically robbed, just ambushed and beaten senseless.

“They beat up our weatherman.”

Then Moberley gave the links – just like Flaherty does.

Just like Google cannot. Or they would have done so long before they decided to stop with brute strength what they could not do with their strongest arguments.

Get Flaherty’s jaw-dropping book, “White Girl Bleed a Lot: The Return of Race Riots to America”


Willie Shields is a writer and radio talk show host in Wilmington, Del. He is the author of “Exit 13A. A Control Tower Diary.”

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