(Science 2.0) Marijuana use has been involved in a sharp increase in fatal motor vehicle crashes, with rates nearly tripling since 1999.

The prevalence of non-alcohol drugs detected in fatally injured drivers in the U.S. has been steadily rising and tripled from 1999 to 2010. Marijuana is the most commonly detected non-alcohol drug involved.

Toxicological testing data from six U.S. states that routinely performed toxicological testing on drivers involved in fatal car crashes (California, Hawaii, Illinois, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and West Virginia) for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System shows that of 23,591 drivers who died within one hour of a crash, 39.7% tested positive for alcohol, which has remained steady.

  • Text smaller
  • Text bigger
Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.