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Does anyone recall any U.S. military bases experiencing shooting attacks prior to 1993?

I don’t.

I can’t find any records. If there were incidents, and I don’t doubt there were, no one was keeping track. That suggests there wasn’t much a problem.

But since 1993, I count at least 14 separate armed attacks resulting in 41 dead and 116 wounded.

Let that sink in – 41 dead and 116 wounded.

Maybe you wonder what happened in 1993 to cause this rash of deadly violence.

Any sane and rational person would ask that question.

That’s the year Army Regulation 190-14 (Carrying of Firearms and Use of Force for Law Enforcement and Security Duties) was amended with new rules on how and when servicemen could carry firearms on military installations. The policy banned the carrying of firearms except for “personnel regularly engaged in law enforcement or security duties.”

What happened was the Army took away the guns – and gun deaths and injuries skyrocketed.

It’s like the old adage states: When guns are outlawed, only outlaws have guns.

With soldiers unarmed, they became sitting ducks. The death and injury numbers spiked.

Looking back on the carnage with the perspective of hindsight, we should now all be able to see what a terrible idea it was banning guns on military bases.

Of course, everyone remembers Maj. Nidal Hassan. In November 2009, he carried out the largest mass murders in American history, opening fire on dozens of disarmed soldiers at a medical deployment center at Fort Hood, Texas. Fourteen were killed, counting an unborn baby, and 31 were wounded.

The most recent, of course, was again at Fort Hood.

It shocks me that the entire country – and especially military men and women – are not demanding this murderous policy be revoked.

It’s just simple common sense.

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How many more need to die before even the gun-grabbers can see the destructive nature of such a policy – taking firearms out of the hands of men and women trained to use them to defend the country, leaving them defenseless on their own bases?

It should be obvious in an age of organized jihadist terrorism that undefended military bases would be a prime target. In fact, al-Qaida is known to have planned attacks on U.S. military bases. We have quite literally placed targets on the backs of every active-duty soldier stationed at home.

What kind of sense does this make?

Thank goodness at least one Fort Hood soldier is going public.

He’s Master Sgt. C.J. Grisham. He’s also president of the board of Open Carry Texas. He is well aware of how much safer he and his fellow soldiers are off base than on.

“Every single one of these shootings happened at a place where the very people trained to deal with armed attackers were defenseless against an armed attacker,” he wrote in a WND commentary.

Think about the absurdity of these rules and regulations.

We’re leaving U.S. military bases open for attack, not just by crazy people, but especially by America’s worst enemies. It’s amazing we haven’t lost more people since Sept. 11, 2001.

We didn’t get the wake-up call then.

We didn’t get it when Nidal Hassan slaughtered two-dozen men, women and children and wounded another 31.

If we don’t get it after Fort Hood II, then America has just plain become politically, morally and intellectually dysfunctional.

What else can I say?

The facts are before us.

The numbers don’t lie.

The most dangerous place to be in America could quite possibly be the gun-free zones that our military bases have become.

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