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The soldiers who landed on D-Day, sparking what eventually became the liberation of a continent, were there because they knew their cause was just, and their purpose right, President Ronald Reagan said during the 40th anniversary of the date.

And that’s why they were victorious, he suggested.

It was in 1984, 30 years ago this year, that Reagan marked the anniversary date with an address that still reverberates across what now is the Internet.

“There is a profound moral difference between the use of force for liberation, and the use of force for conquest,” he said.

The D-Day troops, he said, came “to liberate, not to conquer.”

And the rightness of their cause was because of their dependence on God, he said.

The soldiers themselves weren’t aware at the time that Americans that morning were filling Georgia churches at 4 a.m., and Kansans were kneeling in prayer on their porches, and the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia was ringing.

But they did have a rock solid belief that Providence was on their side, that “a just God would grant them mercy,” he said.

“It was faith and belief, it was loyalty and love,” he said. They carried a strong faith that “what they were doing was right.”

He talked, on the beaches of Normandy, of how an American Ranger team of 225 was left with only 90 “who could bear arms” because of that strategic decision to begin retaking the continent.

“Here the Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history,” he said. “These are the men who took the cliffs. Champions who helped free a continent, helped end a war,” he said.

They believed, he said, in the moral foundation of American, the Judeo-Christian belief in self-government, and “that God was an ally in this great cause.”

Reagan cited how one commander told his parachute troops to kneel in prayer in preparation, and that they should “look up, so you can see God and ask His blessing.”

On the YouTube site for the video, one person contributed, “This is how a man conducts himself before honorable men. This is how a president of the United States celebrates freedom with humility and represents his country with class. It’s been too long since America has had a real president.”

WND previously reported in Weekends with the Gipper on Reagan’s most famous one-liners, including the time he stopped a debate in its tracks by commenting that he would not, for political purposes, exploit his “opponent’s youth and inexperience.”

The WND Superstore offers a virtual library of information about Ronald Reagan, including “The Faith of Ronald Reagan,” “Ronald Reagan: Rendezvous with Destiny,” “In the Face of Evil,” “The Crusader,” “Hand of Providence” and “11 Principles of a Reagan Conservation.”

Other Reagan quips literally made waves around the world, including when he talked about his strategy for dealing with Russia:

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