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Christians under attack by Muslims terrorists in Nigeria are being warned to defend themselves, because the government won’t do it.

“Fight them,” said Rachel Ehrenfeld, director of the American Center for Democracy and the Economic Warfare Institute.

“Unless the non-Muslims in Africa fight the jihadists, they’ll become refugees, enslaved or killed,” she said.

Her comments came just as Christians in the northern Nigeria town of Gwoza were attacked by the jihadist group Boko Haram, killing 100 people and burning several buildings.

Ehrenfeld said Christians “have to be able to fend for themselves, because they can’t rely on the government.”

A former military intelligence officer who served with the Defense Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, Paul Hair, agrees.

Hair told WND Nigerian Christians might have to adopt the tactics of Christians and other non-Muslims in the Central African Republic.

“They might have to fight back brutally with whatever weapons they have. They’re going to need a high desire to achieve complete victory,” he said.

“What else can the Nigerian Christians do if they don’t want to be wiped out? If the government can’t help them, and it’s increasingly questionable if it can, then what use is appealing to it? The U.S. is heavily involved in Nigeria, but the Nigerian Christians shouldn’t expect help from the United States,” Hair said.

He said the American government is allowing its dislike of the Nigerian government’s social policies to interfere with helping counter jihad.

“The heavy U.S. involvement is complicated, and there are certain things the U.S. government doesn’t like about the Nigerian government that is partially hindering whatever working relationship the two governments have. Furthermore, the current U.S. leadership has bizarre priorities in Nigeria, like [Secretary of State John] Kerry’s concerns over Nigeria’s ban on same-sex marriage,” Hair said.

WND reported last week the Obama administration was withholding intelligence from the Nigerian government because of a policy difference over same-sex marriage.

Hair noted to WND there are Christian communities that have faith-based objections to arms while Muslims do not.

“There also isn’t an international community of Christians that are going to help the Nigerian Christians with fighting. When Muslim or Arab communities around the world want to fight, there are no shortages of wealthy groups, not to mention national governments, who will help them in some sort of military capacity if the circumstances are right,” he said.

“That doesn’t exist for Christians anywhere in the world. At most, the international Christian community can offer aid and pleas to governments. Other than that, they can do nothing,” Hair said.

He did note evidence Nigerians are working together for security through a Civilian Joint Task Force. A report in May said organized villagers fought off a Boko Haram attack.

International Christian Concern Africa said Boko Haram previously targeted Christians in Gwoza.

A spokesman said the situation for Christians in northern Nigeria continues to deteriorate as Boko Haram is “now carrying out a mass-land grab for radical Islam.”

“For weeks, the insurgency has laid waste to once peaceful villages, destroyed bridges and erected toll booths for terrorism, and not just in Nigeria.”

Hussein Solomon, senior professor in the Department of Political Studies and Governance at the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa, said the Nigerian military isn’t trained to defend the nation.

“African militaries are not trained to keep citizens safe but to keep regime elites safe from the citizens. They are not soldiers but thugs meant to keep unarmed civilians in line. When having to deal with the likes of Boko Haram, they crumble,” Solomon said.

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