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“In a nutshell, one side wants the other side dead.”

It’s been touted as the “most important video about Israel ever made” — and it’s making the rounds on the Internet. Uploaded in June, it has been viewed nearly four million times as of this writing. Radio talk show host Dennis Prager has produced a six-minute pro-Israel YouTube vid “The Middle East Problem” that explains the Middle East conflict in simple terms:

“If tomorrow Israel laid down its arms and announced, ‘We will fight no more,’ what would happen? And if the Arab countries around Israel laid down their arms and announced, ‘We will fight no more,’ what would happen?” Prager asks. “In the first case, there would be an immediate destruction of the state of Israel and mass murder of its Jewish population. In the second case, there would be peace the next day.”

Zipping along!

Which states in the USA have the fastest — and slowest — Internet speeds? Depending on where you are, your ability to zoom around on the ‘Net is determined by several factors, according the Broadway Networks.

140818internetspeedmap

Those who reside in the Northeast enjoy faster up and download speeds that someone in the Midwest.

Broadway Networks explored the matter: “Using Akamai’s ‘State of the Internet’ report, we were able to find the average Internet speed in each state. The speeds are measured in megabits per second (mbps), which is simply a measurement of data transfer speed within a network. In our map, darker greens represent faster speeds and lighter greens represent slower speeds.”

The state with the fastest Internet speed? Virginia at 13.7 average mbps. The slowest? Alaska at 7 average mbps.

Broadview has a state by state breakdown.

You like?

140818facebooklikeWhat happens if you “‘like” everything on Facebook?

According to Matt Kruse, developer of the Social Fixer browser extension, here’s what happened to one person who did: “My News Feed took on an entirely new character in a surprisingly short amount of time. … There were no human beings in my feed anymore. It became about brands and messaging, rather than humans with messages.”

Mat Honen of Wired’s Gadget Lab conducted his own experiment, posting what happened when he clicked “like” on everything he saw for 48 hours on Facebook: “There is a very specific form of Facebook messaging, designed to get you to interact. And if you take the bait, you’ll be shown it, ad nauseam.”

Here’s the original post.

You don’t look a day over…

Guess my age! Here’s a fun little quiz that claims to guess your age. Try it! I did. It placed me at an age long since past. Ah well, young at heart!

Shtruggle

It’s the “Shtruggle” for stupidity. At least that’s how you’d pronounce it if you were a certain denizen of the White House.

Take the test. (Hat tip to the folks at The Conservative Treehouse for pointing out progressivism’s battle against educated citizens.)

Fruitloops!

Wasting half your strawberries? Cutting your kiwis wrong? This video show how you can more easily get into your fruit. Really! 4.2 million people now know how to peel their pomegranate. Come on, get with it! Peel it off.

Stung by suicide

Bill Whittle has an important message in his latest Afterburner video, “Stung by Suicide.” Anyone with a heart should watch it. Incidentally, new Afterburner messages from Bill Whittle come out every other Thursday. Well worth waiting for.

Virtual visit to the National Archives!

History buffs! Nearly 100,000 people “liked” the official U.S. National Archives Facebook page, which just completed its “Ask A Genealogist” series (#AskAGenealogist). The three-day program covered 20th century individual military records at the National Archives at St. Louis, enemy alien internment during WWII and 20th century individual civil service records.

Three expert archivists answered questions submitted by Facebook fans in the comment section.

Other features include #FirstPetFridays, a weekly look at presidential pups and ponies!

Just in time for some lunch inspiration, this week's #firstpetfriday is Caroline Kennedy's #pony Macaroni. Macaroni was a gift from then Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and even appeared on the cover of Life magazine with Caroline in 1962.Content courtesy of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. #pets (KN-22365; National Archives Identifier 6816421)

Just in time for some lunch inspiration, this week’s #firstpetfriday is Caroline Kennedy’s pony Macaroni. Macaroni was a gift from then Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and even appeared on the cover of Life magazine with Caroline in 1962.
Content courtesy of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. #pets (KN-22365; National Archives Identifier 6816421)

The site is chock full of historic facts and little known tales. For example, the private papers of Grace Tully, the last personal secretary to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Tully’s papers contained many things that were very personal, and it ultimately took an act of Congress to pave the way for her collection to be donated to the U.S. government and the people of the United States. So what exactly did happen with the Tully papers? Why did they end up at the National Archives 25 years after Grace Tully passed away in 1984?

Here’s a timeline of the Tully papers. The collection now resides at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Presidential Library. A video explains more:

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