Alex Trebek on the set of "Jeopardy!"

Alex Trebek on the set of “Jeopardy!”

Alex Trebek and his wildly successful “Jeopardy!” game show are catching heat over a new category of trivia questions that focus on “What Women Want.”

After the Sept. 29 edition aired, a legion of feminists immediately took to social media to blast Trebek and the show for including a “sexist” category.

One question was posed like this: “Some help around the house; would it kill you to get out the Bissel Bagless canister one of these every once in a while?”

The correct answer? “What is a vacuum cleaner?”

Another clue read, “Before bed, a cup of this herbal tea from Celestial Seasonings; that’s the logo, seen here.” The correct response was “What is Sleepytime?”

The answer to another question was “a pair of jeans that fit well.”

Actress Sophia Bush was one of hundreds to use Twitter to express her unbridled horror. She tweeted: “For a ‘smart’ show, you just got srsly stupid RT.”

Late-night host David Letterman jumped on the bandwagon, adding the question to his running tab of “Top 10” most offensive “Jeopardy!” questions.

But the authors of a new book with almost the exact same title as the offending “Jeopardy!” category had a different take on the budding controversy.WB273

The three female authors of “What Women Really Want,” released just a few weeks ago by WND Books, came to Trebek’s defense while taking a swat at the feminists.

“Women everywhere should be fed up with only hearing about what THEY want – meaning the feminist harpies screeching about a category on a game show,” said Ann-Marie Murrell, co-author of the book with Gina Loudon and Morgan Brittany. “THEY have been dictating the rules to women, demanding they follow their feminist, anti-family, anti-male lead and leave their homes and families behind.”

Murrell, the editor-in-chief and CEO of PolitiChicks.com, said radical feminists – not Trebek – have been “trying to put women in tiny little boxes for decades.”

She emailed to WND the following feminist statements as just a few of the most outrageous examples:

“How will the family unit be destroyed? … the demand alone will throw the whole ideology of the family into question, so that women can begin establishing a community of work with each other and we can fight collectively. Women will feel freer to leave their husbands and become economically independent, either through a job or welfare.” – Roxanne Dunbar in Female Liberation.

“Feminists have long criticized marriage as a place of oppression, danger, and drudgery for women.” – From article, “Is Marriage the Answer?” – Barbara Findlen in Ms magazine, May-June, 1995

“The Feminists -v- The Marriage License Bureau of the State of New York … All the discriminatory practices against women are patterned and rationalized by this slavery-like practice. We can’t destroy the inequities between men and women until we destroy marriage.” – From Sisterhood Is Powerful, Morgan (ed), 1970 p. 537.

The same women furious about a “Jeopardy!” category are those who ridicule women who wish to stay home and raise their children, Murrell said.

“They are the same women who denigrate and ridicule anyone who believes the family unit is vital for the continuation of humankind,” she said. “What we are hoping to accomplish with our book, ‘What Women (Really) Want,’ is that women will finally see this type of propaganda for what it actually is – a brand new form of modern-day slavery.”

Murrell said she and her two co-authors, Brittany and Loudon, have been lambasted while on their book tour by feminists, not so much for the content of their book, “but almost solely because of the way we look, our ages, etc.”

She said feminist outrage never seems to get as heated over Islamic abuse of women as it does about a simple game show.

“I would perhaps take these feminist comments about ‘Jeopardy!’ more seriously if they expressed the same type of outrage toward real oppressed women, including the thousands of women and children who are experiencing rape jihad in the Middle East; women being stoned to death under Shariah law, genital mutilation, honor killings, etc.,” Murrell said. “But of course you never hear a peep out of any of them about these things.”

Instead, they seem to save their most vitriolic commentary for “elitist First-World problems like the cost of sex products and insisting on making dollar for dollar what every man makes in the work force,” Murrel said. “They, and not Alex Trebek or an entertaining game show, need to get their priorities in order.”

Get “What Women Really Want,” a call to women across this great land to wake up and take a stand against the cultural forces that are fighting tooth-and-nail to destroy their spirit and their families – at the WND Superstore!

“Jeopardy!” is one of the most successful TV game shows in television history and has been hosted by Trebek in its current daily syndicated form since September 1984.

Brittany, an actress, PolitiChicks blogger and co-author of “What Women Really Want,” also weighed in about the “Jeopardy!” brouhaha, which she characterized as a phony scandal.

“It looks like the hysterical feminists have jumped the shark on this one. It’s a GAME SHOW! They are grasping at anything to push their dying agenda,” Brittany said. “Women are sick of it. If you look at the comments section after the article you can see the majority of American women DO NOT put birth control, abortion, etc, at the top of their priorities. The radical feminist movement does not live in the ‘real’ world that women live in. They are obviously not concerned about the issues that most women face because if they were, they wouldn’t have time to even comment on a simple, (successful) game show that millions of people enjoy. ‘Jeopardy!’ does not push a political agenda, as far as I can see, but everything about these wacko feminists is political.

“They are panicking at the reality that millions of women might WANT to stay at home and raise their children, might WANT to get a little help around the house, and might WANT to look sexy in a tight pair of jeans!

“I say, let them talk, let them rant, and let them be as angry as they want. We women just shake our heads and realize there are much more important things facing us in our world today.”

Loudon, a Ph.D. and psychology expert who also writes for PolitiChicks, released the following statement Thursday about the controversy, which she sarcastically titled “My favorite pair of jeans.”

I might be more impressed with the feminists’ feigned outrage if they were half as concerned about the damage they have done to our culture, in terms of what women across the country have been telling us, as we’ve toured to promote our new best-selling book, ‘What Women Really Want.’ The women we talked to said they wanted national security, economic security and real freedoms.

Personally, as a woman, I am much less upset about a Jeopardy question than being told by radicals that I am only concerned about birth-control that I could easily afford for myself if I wanted it.

For me, personally, I am more concerned about whether or not I fit in my favorite jeans than I am about how somebody can get $15 worth of free birth control or access to kill babies, in what is already a national Holocaust.

I am more concerned about whether not I can fit in my favorite jeans than I am about how Planned Parenthood can get more than $1 million a day of my taxpayer money for abortion on demand.

I am more concerned about fitting in my favorite jeans than I am about a group of radical feminists insinuating that I can’t control my own urges and impulses, and that I need big daddy government to take care of that for me.

And finally, I am more concerned about getting in my favorite pair of jeans than I am having a government that is convinced that they can buy off my vote for a measly $15 per month.

The issues that matter to me, like every other real woman in the country, are national security, economic security and real freedom. I stand by that, I would fight for that, and would I burn my favorite pair of jeans for that!

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