Samy Gemayel

Samy Gemayel

If the U.S. and international community do not intervene, Christians may be driven out of the Middle Eastern Arab countries within two years, warned Lebanese parliamentarian Samy Gemayel during a radio interview Sunday.

Gemayel, a senior member of the Phalange Party, descends from a historic Lebanese Christian family.

His father, Amin, was the country’s president, while his brother, Pierre, was a member of parliament and a government minister before his assassination Nov. 21, 2006. Samy Gemayel’s uncle, former president-elect Bashir Gemayel, also was assassinated.

Speaking on “Aaron Klein Investigative Radio,” broadcast on New York’s AM 970 The Answer and Philadelphia’s NewsTalk 990, Gemayel warned Christians and moderate Muslims are victims of two extremist forces fighting each other.

He stated: “Today all the moderates in the region are taken between two big extremists powers. On one side you have ISIS and on the other side you have the Islamic state of Iran.

“So you have two Islamic states with two very extremist ideologies fighting against each other. And the moderates are stuck in a sandwich between these two powers.”

Amid widespread reports of Christian persecution at the hands of Islamic extremists, Gemayel complained regional Christian leaders and minority communities are not receiving enough support from the U.S. and international community.

“Unfortunately the Christians are paying the price all over the region and that’s why we have been calling for the international community to do something about the Christians all over the region,” he said. “That means support. And they are left alone.”

He warned that “maybe in two years you will not have Christians in the region anymore except in Lebanon because we are strong and we are still defending ourselves.”

Gemayel told Klein that while he has been disappointed by the lack of Western support, he sees some positive developments in the military alliance of Sunni states such as Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Jordan. Sunni Arab countries have banded together to confront Irainan-backed Shiite rebels in Yemen.

“These moderate Sunnis are fighting fellow Sunnis,” Gemayel proclaimed. “The alliance today of KSA and the Arab emirates is targeting the Sunni extremists. This is Sunni moderates fighting Sunni extremists.”

“I believe this is a very good message that is sent by the Sunni world, saying that we don’t want extremism in our world.”

Gemayel said the U.S. is backing the wrong side in its sweeping negotiations with Iran.

“Unfortunately, I believe the dialogue with Iran is sending the wrong message,” he told Klein.

The Sunni regimes, in turn, are “sending a very clear signal to the Unites States saying that you have to be careful not to jump over all the Sunnis of the region,” Gemayel stated.

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