(ZeroHedge) Last week, Chicago got some bad news from Moody’s. On the heels of an Illinois Supreme Court decision that struck down a pension reform law, the ratings agency cut the city to junk status, triggering some $2.2 billion in accelerated payment rights for the city’s creditors and complicating Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s efforts to refinance nearly a billion in floating rate notes and borrow another $200 million to pay off the accompanying swaps.

The Moody’s downgrade in many ways punctuates what has been a rapid deterioration in state and local government finances across the country, a situation that’s forcing lawmakers to slash budgets and cut funding for a variety of state-funded programs.

In downgrading the city, Moody’s said it expected “Chicago’s credit challenges will continue, both in the near term and in the long term [as] unfunded liabilities of the Municipal, Laborer, Police, and Fire pension plans grow and exert increasing pressure on the city’s operating budget.” That looks to have been an accurate assessment, because as Bloomberg reports, Chicago’s budget gap is set to triple by 2017.

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