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Good intentions along the road to hell

During the last dozen or so years, I have become more aware of the unseen hands guiding the world’s affairs. They have a definite destination in mind.

These unseen hands don’t push ours out of the way as we study the chessboard and ready our next move. No, more often they arrange the circumstances around us to guide our own hand in the direction they will.

You may call these hands fate, destiny, God or the devil. What they are called doesn’t much matter. What they do, does.

Here, the U.S. Supreme Court’s two recent decisions on Obamacare and marriage are instructive. As the court had done the first time Mr. Obamacare appeared in its courtroom, it simply reinterpreted what Congress had written so that the benefit to certain people, at the expense of others, could be preserved. First it wasn’t a tax, then it was a tax. This time it wasn’t a subsidy, now it is a subsidy. Ho, hum. Nothing to see here. Next case.

The whole SCOTUS thing strikes me rather like a motorist who is stopped for speeding. The man then invites the officer to walk back to the most recent sign with the posted speed limit, which was just behind them. In the policeman’s presence, the motorist withdraws a spray can and paints a new number on the sign that makes his rate of travel through town legal. “There. Fixedya.” No difference between a renegade motorist and our Supreme Court.

For the more thoughtful, the question as to “why” arises. Did the court learn nothing from its disastrous abortion decision? That decision led directly to the deaths of 60 million infants. That one court decision alone puts America right up there with Stalin and Mao in murder and mayhem. This court doesn’t want to legislate morality – it wants to legislate human conscience. And legislating is what it is doing. A simple majority of nine people now rewrite the law to please themselves.

It’s tempting to say, “I’d like to see their bank accounts and social calendars,” in trying to understand such behavior. The truth, I think, lies more toward the latter. Here is what a very astute observer of world events had to say about this way back when (Oct. 15, 1950):

“Bertrand Russell’s Unpopular Essays please and irritate at the same time, like so many things. Consider his kind of mind and point of view, though in a way attractive, the most ruinous of all, the most destructive, the most cowardly, the most lamentable. His reason tells him to seek what pleases and to shun the disagreeable, and, obeying it, he becomes utterly selfish, indifferent to all forms of responsibility, person and social – in fact, the precise opposite of what he intends. Tolerance in excess is as much a vice as any other virtue in excess.” [“Like It Was: The Diaries of Malcolm Muggeridge,” William Morrow and Company Inc., 1982, p. 415]

Washington, D.C., is now an echo chamber filled with pompous people-pleasers and others with checkbooks at the ready who want to be pleased. With enough money in hand, voters become irrelevant because they can be manipulated once every few years.

There is no moral compass guiding our nation’s decisions. The result with these finger-in-the-air types is situational ethics, contradictory laws and enforcement, and ultimately chaos – which destroys the many for the benefit of the few. Therefore, sexual license now automatically entitles one to a marriage license – which states cannot deny. Children become chattel. And that most basic right – conscience – is to be denied the many in service of the DC cocktail circuit.

If there were no supernatural element to this, America could perhaps at some point recover from these decisions. There is. She won’t.


Has God pronounced judgement on America? What might He do before it arrives?

Media wishing to interview Craige McMillan, please contact [email protected].