Hillary Clinton supporters all had the same message after she was grilled by Chuck Todd on her personal server scandal, Sept. 27, 2015: "Move on." (Image: NBC, "Meet the Press" screenshot)

Hillary Clinton supporters all had the same message after she was grilled by Chuck Todd on her personal server scandal, Sept. 27, 2015: “Time to move on.” (Image: NBC’s “Meet the Press”)

Hillary Clinton’s campaign drew laughs from “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd after her surrogates and staff had identical messages following his questions on her private email server: “Time to move on.”

The former secretary of state was grilled for roughly 10 minutes by Todd on Sunday over her decision to use a personal server during her tenure at the U.S. State Department. Her supporters then unleashed a flurry a similar talking points that made MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” panel laugh on Monday.

NBC’s Willie Geist said “everyone who is remotely a part of the campaign” seemed to be in on the effort.

“I saw that!” said Todd with grin, Mediaite reported. “That was a little ham-handed. Especially when it’s exactly the same, right? It’s clear somebody cut and paste from the email, from whatever email.”

Mediaite rightly noted the illegality of coordination between a campaign’s staff and its Super PAC supporters.

Who do you love? Get your favorite presidential bumper sticker here! Check out WND Superstore’s mind-blowing and hilarious selection

“Questions on @HillaryClinton’s emails on this morning’s #MTP? Asked and answered. Time to move on,” wrote Hillary for America spokesperson Karen Finney on Sunday.

“Questions on @HillaryClinton’s emails on this morning’s #MTP? Asked and answered. Time to move on,” echoed Woodhouse, who serves as president of the progressive advocacy group Americans United for Change and the Democratic Super PAC American Bridge.

(Image: Twitter, Hilary Rosen)

(Image: Twitter, Karen Finney)

On Sunday, Todd interviewed Clinton for roughly 17 minutes. He told viewers no question was off limits.

“Had every government agency head did what did you at the State Department, there would be a lot of information that wasn’t in the public. Do you see that now as a problem as far as the public is concerned?” Todd asked Clinton.

“As I have said very often, all of the emails that I sent were intended to be in the government systems if they were work-related. That’s why I sent to people at their work addresses,” Clinton responded. “The vast majority of them ended up there. I have said also that if I had to do it over again, I would have used a separate email account. I did it for convenience and it turned out not to be that at all. The bottom line is, my emails were predominantly in the State Department email system or on other government servers.”

(Image: Twitter, Hilary Rosen)

(Image: Twitter, Hilary Rosen)

Todd didn’t hesitate to point out how Clinton’s decision would hamper efforts by the federal government to fulfill Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA, requests.

“That’s very difficult to capture all of your emails by going to perhaps thousands of people and their .gov accounts. It would have been a lot easier if it was sent to your .gov account,” said Todd.

“Look, I think I have done all that I can to take responsibility, to be as transparent as possible.” Clinton replied.

(Image: Twitter, Brad Woodhouse)

(Image: Twitter, Brad Woodhouse)

Clinton has tried to fend off questions about her personal server since March and roughly 30,000 “personal” emails she deleted.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is now in possession of her server and is attempting to determine if classified information was mishandled.

Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.