Hillary Clinton speaks to an audience in Charleston, South Carolina, Oct. 30, 2015

Hillary Clinton speaks to an audience in Charleston, South Carolina, Oct. 30, 2015

Teleprompters could not stop former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from making a giant Freudian slip at an event last Friday.

It is unclear whether former President Bill Clinton’s past legal troubles, or the FBI’s current investigation into her personal email server while with the Obama administration, was on her mind when she said, “Earlier today, I announced that as president I will take steps to ban the box so former presidents won’t have to declare their criminal history at the very start of the hiring process.”

Clinton was speaking at the NAACP’s 98th annual Freedom Fund Banquet in Charleston, South Carolina, when she made the mistake.

In the pages of “Target: Caught in the Crosshairs of Bill and Hillary Clinton,” Democratic activist Kathleen Willey breaks a decade-long silence to reveal the shocking details of her torment at the hands the Clintons. Get your copy today at the WND Superstore.

“Was it a gaffe? A Freudian slip? A softening liberal opinion of the Bush family? A subtle tip of the cap to Ulysses S. Grant’s reckless horse and buggy rides? Maybe all of the above,” Slate wrote Tuesday.

The Democratic front-runner for the Party’s 2016 presidential nomination meant to say “prisoners,” a reference to upward of 6,000 convicted drug felons who were scheduled to be released two days after her speech.

The Obama administration also announced Monday that executive orders to “ban the box” would be coming soon. The measures will delay the period of time before ex-convicts must disclose their criminal history to federal hiring personnel and federal contractors.

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