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The Alfred P. Murrah federal building in Oklahoma City was bombed on April 19, 1995. (Fox News video screenshot)

Jayna Davis put her journalistic career on the line 20 years ago to prove that a third terrorist, the so-called John Doe No. 2, was a Middle Eastern man who was seen in the Ryder truck with Timothy McVeigh.

McVeigh detonated the truck, blowing up the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995.

It was the largest act of terrorism on U.S. soil prior to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. It killed 168 Americans and wounded 680, and Davis sees stark parallels between that attack and the one earlier this month in San Bernardino.

Jayna Davis wrote a best-seller about the Oklahoma City bombing in 2004.

Jayna Davis wrote a best-seller about the Oklahoma City bombing in 2004.

Both included native-born men with clean images, a “useful idiot” and a shadowy Middle Easterner.

The Middle Eastern man in Oklahoma, she contends, was Hussain al-Hussaini, a former Iraqi soldier who came to the United States as a refugee after the first Gulf War.

Hussaini was one of about 6,000 Iraqi soldiers who were reclassified as refugees, poorly vetted and allowed into the United States under President Bill Clinton’s watch.

According to Davis’ research, Hussaini was seen by several witnesses with McVeigh in the days leading up to the bombing, and one witness saw him get out of the Ryder truck with McVeigh before it blew up.

Davis was a dogged TV reporter back then for the NBC affiliate in Oklahoma City. She accumulated vast amounts of evidence tying Hussaini to the crime and presented it the FBI.

But the boys at the bureau weren’t interested. They had their case of “homegrown domestic terror” against two native-born Americans, Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, and they refused to consider that the case may have involved an element of international terror. McVeigh, a veteran of the first Gulf War, would get a lethal injection in 2001 while Nichols received life behind bars.

Hussaini drifted for years, in and out of mental institutions, and finally landed in jail for assaulting another man with a broken beer bottle.

In 2005 Nichols admitted in a jailhouse interview with Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., that the theory put forth by Davis in her book, “The Third Terrorist: The Middle Eastern Connection to the Oklahoma City Bombing,” was accurate and that other people were involved in the attack. But Nichols refused to provide names, citing fears that it could endanger his family.

third terrorist bookHer book became a New York Times-bestseller in 2005 but the FBI never took note.

OKC a ‘blueprint’ for future attacks

Davis says the FBI still hasn’t learned the pivotal lesson in the way it investigates terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. And those failures were on full display in the recent San Bernardino attack.

“What I found in 1995 was basically a blueprint for terrorist attacks today. What I found as a journalist, it’s basically what is happening today,” she said. “I see striking parallels between 1995 and what is happening today.”

If Davis has cracked the code, what does it reveal?

She believes the government is lying about the nature of the attacks. The San Bernardino shooters were not merely “self-radicalized” or “inspired” by a foreign terrorist organization.

Rather, she believes they were part of a larger network of sleeper cells operating within the United States. This network has been in place at least since the early 1990s following the first President George Bush’s Gulf War. It was after that war that the U.S. started bringing in large contingents of Islamic “refugees,” from places like Iraq, Somalia, Afghanistan, Bosnia and Uzbekistan.

But there are also American citizens who are recruited to deflect attention from the web of international Islamic terror.

“They are starting to use what are called ‘lily whites,'” Davis said. These are men or women who would not naturally draw the attention of law enforcement.

“Our Pakistani terrorist, Mr. Syed Farook, even though his ethnicity was Pakistani, he still was a U.S. born, full American citizen. He’s educated and gainfully employed, had a new baby and was starting a family,” she said. “He wasn’t doing anything to draw attention.”

That is potentially more dangerous, more sinister than a “lone wolf” who just wants to kill for the notoriety or fame it will offer.

‘Just a normal guy’

Davis compares Farook to McVeigh, the former U.S. Army infantryman who won accolades for bravery in Iraq but felt jilted when his efforts to join U.S. special operations were spurned.

Farook also went out of his way to blend in. He didn’t broadcast his intentions on social media or boast to a friend. His co-workers all described him as polite and affable, showing no signs of having ill intent against anyone. He was just a “normal guy,” they said.

“The scariest part of it is, these people did nothing deliberately to draw attention to themselves, they used aliases, they destroyed hard drives and cellphones,” Davis said.

They also had their “useful idiot” in Enrique Marquez, a friend and neighbor who bought the two assault refiles about two years prior to the attack.

If Farook and his wife, Tashfeen Malik, had truly been “self-radicalized” as the FBI insists, they would have left a trail on social media.

“Their egos, they’ve got to be known, they’ve got to be noticed, those are the ones that law enforcement really don’t have a problem recognizing,” Davis said. “But these two were not like that.”

Sleeper cells inside the United States

But there is a more dangerous threat. And it’s much more subtle and hard to detect.

“I believe there are sleeper agents here in the United States of America, I believe these terrorists have tactical support. I don’t believe they just got self-radicalized online,” Davis told WND. “They went dark, they went to encrypted communications. And it’s been weeks now and the FBI can’t crack it.”

Davis says the hallmark traits of a self-radicalized terrorist is that they are seeking notoriety and don’t cover their tracks.

“They would want the credit for everything they did,” she said. “But these guys are spooky and it’s the way we are going to be struck in the homeland, and there is a major infrastructure in place in major cities across the U.S.”

Enter Enrique Marquez, the 24-year-old useful idiot who dabbled in Islam and befriended Farook years ago when they were still too young to buy weapons or practice using them.

The New York Times reported that Marquez would get loose lipped after a few drinks at a local bar, where he worked cleaning toilets and checking IDs. He talked a lot about sleeper cells getting ready to rise up in America.

“He would say stuff like: ‘There’s so much going on. There’s so many sleeper cells, so many people just waiting. When it happens, it’s going to be big. Watch,’ ” Nick Rodriguez, a frequent bar patron who had known Marquez on and off for the past two years, told the Times. “We took it as a joke. When you look at the kid and talk to him, no one would take him seriously about that.”

Now, everyone is taking Marquez seriously. Even the FBI, which arrested him last week in connection with the San Bernardino shooting.

Whatever information he may have provided about Farook has thus far been kept secret.

“There is one clue that the FBI has not explained,” Davis says. “Why do you cover your tracks if your only goal is martyrdom? Unless you are part of something larger, unless you have already sworn allegiance to a wider network.”

So, while there has been endless media attention in recent weeks about Syrian refugees coming to America and whether they can be properly vetted, Davis believes that’s a distraction.

More than a million Islamic refugees and asylum seekers have already arrived in the U.S. since 1990, straight from jihadist cesspools in the Middle East and Africa.

“God forbid if it becomes the headline of the month, another attack, because we do have a sleeper network here in the United States of America. And it’s been building since the 1990s,” Davis said. “Oklahoma City was the nerve center. My intelligence sources in the U.S. government called it Little Syria. There’s a reason why (terrorism investigator) Steve Emerson began his investigation right here in OKC. This is what we are not acknowledging. We have to demand more from our law enforcement.”

Another parallel between the Oklahoma City attack and San Bernardino was that both incidents produced multiple eyewitnesses of additional terrorists. A “third shooter” was seen jumping out of the SUV in San Bernardino and police even conducted a house-to-house search in the area, only to come back later and say there never was a third shooter.

The FBI also has ample evidence to suspect that Farook and Malik were part of a wider network.

“Number one they were low profile. They thought of themselves as jihadists and they were loyal to ISIS in Syria,” Davis said. “The FBI said she was posting online right after the attack. Why would she hide her face, why would she use an alias in her communications, why the encrypted messages and the attempt at a getaway? They had someone else buy their rifles …If they didn’t want to be noticed it’s because they wanted to continue their terrorist rampage elsewhere.”

Marquez and Farook reportedly hatched another terror plot more than a year earlier but they got cold feet and scuttled their plans, ostensibly because there had been an arrest of several other terrorists in the region charged with providing material support to overseas terrorists.

Obama describes Farook, Malik as ‘self-radicalized’

Three days after the California attack, Obama took to the podium in a prime-time, televised address. He was careful to portray the tragedy as part of a plot by two “self-radicalized” domestic terrorists who acted without direction from any wider network or overseas terrorist organization.

“It was just inspired (by overseas terrorists), not directed,” Davis said.

Davis is now revisiting what she discovered more than two decades ago in Oklahoma City.

“We have a direct connection of the hierarchy of the ISIS terror network,” she said.

WND put a face on that network, she said, when it reported that a former Somali refugee turned American citizen and then ISIS recruiter was mentioned by the FBI as having had communications with Farook prior to the San Bernardino attack. His name was Mohamed Hassan, who lived in Minneapolis, Minnesota, attended local schools and left the country in 2008 during his senior year of high school to join a terrorist network in Somalia.

Strangely, no other major media outlets picked up the story about Hassan, other than Fox News, which failed to report that he had come to the U.S. as a refugee.

Hassan also played a key role in “inspiring” the attack by two jihadists on Garland, Texas, at a “draw Muhammad” cartoon contest in May. He had tweeted 10 days before the Garland attacks that the “brothers in Paris” were to be congratulated for their attack on the Charlie Hebdo magazine office and now the “brothers in the U.S.” needed to step up and carry out their own attack. He then followed that tweet with another offering the link to the Garland, Texas, event hosted by Pamela Geller.

But after his name surfaced again in the San Bernardino attack, Hassan mysteriously turned himself in to Somali authorities, claiming his innocence.

“Look at the way the FBI is backtracking as Hassan turned himself in and said he didn’t do it,” Davis said.

Like Hassan, the Iraqi soldier Hussein al-Hussaini had also entered the U.S. as a refugee.

As Congress and the nation’s governors debate whether 10,000 Syrian refugees should be allowed into the country, it was reported last week that 100,000 Syrians had already entered the U.S. on green cards since 2012.

A similar number of Somali Muslims have entered the U.S. since 1990 and another 120,000 have come from Iraq. Thousands of others have come from Afghanistan, Bosnia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan and Burma.

“Why are we worried about the 10,000 and not the hundreds of thousands who are already here?” Davis said.

‘Vetting’ problems under Clinton presidency

Eight Iraqi soldiers arrived in Boston in 1994, placed there by the International Rescue Committee, one of nine private agencies that contract with the federal government to resettle foreign refugees into more than 180 U.S. cities and towns. These eight men, one of whom was Hussaini, were part of a broader group of 6,000 Iraqi soldiers who came to the U.S. during that same time frame. Another contingent of at least 100,000 came from Iraq between 2001 and 2015.

As for the 6,000, they were mainly enemy combatants who took up arms against U.S. soldiers during the first Gulf War.

“The only way we could resettle them was to reclassify from ex-enemy combatant to refugee and claiming if they go back home Saddam’s going to kill them,” Davis said. “We took them at their word because we couldn’t check their backgrounds with Saddam in power. But the translators kept saying they believed a lot of these guys were lying and they were trying to infiltrate through our refugee program.”

President Bill Clinton inherited the problem from President George H.W Bush.

“(Former CIA Director) Jim Woolsey said at the time that the U.S. had no databases to vet these people, we had to take them at their word,” Davis said. “And as it turned out one of them bombed an American federal building in Oklahoma City. They teamed up with a native-born man, Timothy McVeigh. It’s tragic but true.”

Meanwhile, Clinton was bringing in his own preferred group of Muslims from Bosnia following the Kosovo conflict in which the U.S. and NATO went to war against the Christian Serbs.

Today’s Syrian refugees present the same problem as the Iraqis in the 1990s. FBI Director James Comey has echoed the earlier warnings of Woolsey, that it’s impossible to vet the Syrians or even confirm many of their identities.

But because of political correctness, the Syrians will be coming, 10,000 this year and “many more,” according to the U.S. State Department, in fiscal 2017.

“It’s the same thing, we have nothing, no data, to compare and cross check,” Davis said. ” I’m not a racist, I’m saying I believe in history and evidence and can prove it in a court of law.”

There are other parallels as well between Oklahoma City and San Bernardino.

Farook went abroad to find a jihadist wife, Malik, who he met online and then claimed in Saudi Arabia.

Terry Nichols did the same thing, picking up a “mail order bride,” Davis said.

Farook, with his U.S. passport, drew no attention when he traveled to Saudi Arabia and elsewhere in the Middle East, where many believe he picked up valuable terrorist training.

“He went to the Middle East, he got trained, so he came back, but he had a passport, there’s no red flags for that,” Davis said.

In yet another parallel, McVeigh’s defense team had uncovered evidence that Terry Nichols received training in bomb making from the mastermind of the 1993 World Trade Center attack, Ramzi Yousef, during his many forays to the South Pacific islands.

Davis said the FBI is not trained to look for the proper red flags.

“I don’t care if he is of Middle-Eastern descent, if he’s Asian, or if he’s Caucasian; the bottom line is what’s between his ears? What’s his ideology? Do I hate the U.S. government, its foreign policy? Do I act on that, and then try to cover it up, to protect the U.S. sleeper cell network, which has already been in place since at least the early 1990s? That’s what’s coming, and that’s what’s going to instill fear in the hearts of the American public. And that’s what’s going to bring us down.”

‘You’ll never hear’ the truth

Davis said she lays the blame squarely at the foot of the U.S. government because authorities have had this template since the mid-1990s.

“They deny it exists. They know it exists, but they deny it. That’s why you’re hearing the words ‘self-radicalized,’ that’s why you’re hearing the words ‘inspired by’ ISIS, but not ‘directed by.’

“You’ll never hear that there’s a network of sleeper-cells organized, trained and ready to rise up in this country,” she continued. “You will never hear about a sleeper cell, or terrorist cell. The American people, because they’re not educated enough and because they’re busy trying to make a living, are never going to understand. The minute you hear “inspired,” you think, ‘OK, this is not an organized attack.’ There’s no way the FBI is leaking that to the New York Times.”

Davis said the FBI will never “under any circumstances” disclose to the American people that there is a jihadist sleeper structure within the U.S. and that these cells can be activated at any time.

“And the FBI will not see them coming until people die,” she said.

“That’s what I see coming.”

CAIR puts fear into hearts of Americans

After the 9/11 attacks, the newly formed Department of Homeland Security came out with an ad campaign that encouraged the public to call in tips about strange activity. They called it “See something, say something.”

But that policy has been successfully undermined by groups like the Council on American-Islamic Relations or CAIR, which threatens to sue over any speech it considers “anti-Muslim.”

CAIR and its affiliated Muslim Brotherhood organizations have succeeded in creating a climate in which people are more afraid of being branded an “Islamophobe” than they are of the terrorists.

This was never more clear than in the case of Farook. Construction workers in his neighborhood noticed suspicious activity for weeks, with Middle Eastern men coming and going, packages being delivered and strange noises from the garage. But they said they decided not to report the suspicious activity for fear of being called racists.

“CAIR shows up, and they let everybody know if you say anything, if you say radical Islam, you’re going to get sued,” Davis said.

And CAIR’s allies sit at the pinnacle of power. Obama’s own attorney general, Loretta Lynch, warned after San Bernardino that she would not hesitate to prosecute any American who spoke critically of Muslims in a way that could be seen as inciting violence.

But what happens to criminal refugees like Hussein al-Husseini?

He has a violent crime on his record for assault and battery with a deadly weapon. He slashed a man’s face with a beer bottle.

But rather than be deported, Hussaini was able to stall his trial for four-and-a-half years by checking in and out of mental hospitals. He reportedly confessed to the crime, but that didn’t hurt him.

“He was going to have to go to trial, finally they had a hearing three months ago on his confession, and the judge threw it out because he said this poor pitiful refugee couldn’t understand English. I interviewed him and he understood English perfectly, he was fluent,” Davis said. “But they threw it out. They were able to neutralize the charge and he did not go to a state penitentiary, and was never deported. So when he gets out in 11 months he’s going to hurt someone else.”

There were 6,000 Iraqi prisoners of war who came to the U.S. around the same time and the evidence suggests one of them, Husseini, “was complicit in the Oklahoma City bombing and took down a nine-story federal building and killed 168 people,” Davis said.

Now two more terrorists have struck in San Bernardino, with a third accomplice, Marquez, implicated. Evidences suggests the killers tried to cover their tracks, which flies in the face of the “lone wolf who got self-radicalized” theory.

But, according to the FBI and President Obama, there are no Middle Eastern terrorist networks inside the United States. They do not exist.

The ‘poster girl’ for PC police

And if any journalist or FBI agent tries to say otherwise, no matter the evidence they may uncover, they will be blackballed and likely sued.

That’s what happened to Davis. She won the suit, however, as Husseini’s claims of libel against her were dismissed.

“I’m the poster girl for what happens with political correctness. Give up your profession. I was vindicated, but to this day I’m, quote ‘the racist reporter who went after the Middle Eastern guy,’ and dammit I was right,” Davis said.

“The danger is, they are not going to take you seriously, and pray you don’t get sued,” she added. “Look what happened with the little Alarm Clock Boy who was apprehended for what appeared to be a bomb. It’s working. I have got to give them credit. They have won. We do not have a front line of defense. The DHS and FBI will not protect this country when it is threatened by international terrorist groups, and they are living among us. So, as long as we don’t say it, we don’t speak it, the terrorists win.”

So the terrorist networks will continue to go by their playbook, which has proven  successful beyond their wildest dreams, she said.

“Cover your tracks, use the useful idiot. Farook – he just wanted to belong. Tim McVeigh was under the control of the Iraqi network. Someone was controlling Farook and Malik. How do we know that? Because they covered their tracks so no one would find them afterwards. They had skills, they had training, they knew how to communicate in secret, they knew how to use aliases online, and how to control and remain unseen. They didn’t draw attention to themselves, they were trained, they were disciplined. That’s the way McVeigh was. Somehow they would team up with Middle Eastern terrorists, who would have thought?”

The Oklahoma City beheader, an African-American Muslim convert named Alton Nolen who decapitated a female co-worker, was also dubbed “self-radicalized.” His act of terror was classified as “workplace violence.”

“He was your classic self-radicalizer, but I don’t believe it,” Davis said. “He attended the local mosque. Everything. It’s like they’re taking it from the OKC playbook. Use of lily whites. Terrorists living in our midst, they have an organized terrorist infrastructure they can activate anytime they want. Everyone is screaming about our borders and Syrian refugees, and I get that, but they’re already here.”

“You’re going to see the same talking points, if they can’t get away with calling it workplace violence they’re going to say they were self-radicalized or ‘inspired’ but not sponsored by an international terrorist network. You’re going to see ‘ISIS-inspired.’

“They say it was inspired in one breath and then in the next breath they’re saying they went out of their way to hide their identity and they destroyed their cells and hard drives and they used aliases and they went overseas for training. That Somali guy (Hassan) – he absolutely is a player, his tracks he can’t cover them now, but our FBI is in the mindset that they won’t pursue it any further. That’s the PC policy. They did it with the Boston bombers. They knew from the Russians they could absolutely confirm the communications between the Tsarnaev brothers and the hierarchy. If they’d gone to their social media and looked under their aliases, they would have seen it.”

The younger brother posted and said he was going to carry out an attack two years prior to the actual attack in summer of 2013.

“He said he was coming after us. That came out in the trial,” Davis said. “The media is not going to cover it. They just cover the slaughter of the week, the slaughter of the month, they won’t connect the dots.”

Davis believes Oklahoma City served as the 21st century blueprint for Islamic terror on American soil.

“We’re playing catch up 20 years later.”

It’s not just about ISIS. The head of ISIS, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was the head of al-Qaida in Iraq. U.S. forces let him go. He later formed the Islamic State, also called ISIS.

“Hear no evil, speak no evil, see no evil,” Davis said. “There is no Middle Eastern terrorist network on U.S. soil. That is the policy of the FBI.”

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