St. Matthews mall in Kentucky was the site of mayhem. (Credit: Twitter)

St. Matthews mall in Kentucky was the site of mayhem. (Credit: Twitter)

Two thousand or so juveniles, or near-juvenile aged individuals, broke out in fights and public disturbances at the Mall St. Matthews in Kentucky, leading police to shutter shopping in the area and call for backup from five different law enforcement agencies.

And according to one author who’s analyzed the black violence trend in America: Another dozen or so similar riots took place this Christmas season at malls around the country, all committed at the hands of blacks.

On Monday, business operations at the Kentucky mall and surrounding stores were restored to operation. But the weekend was hectic.

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St. Matthews officer Dennis McDonald, a spokesman for the force, said police were called to the mall for a couple “disturbances,” NBC News reported.

“As they were responding to those disturbances, others were breaking out,” he went on. “Disturbances started to feed on themselves. They were just overwhelmed with a number of calls for service and reports of disorder.”

A “series of brawls” involving up to 2,000 people between the ages of 13 and early 20s ultimately broke out, McDonald said, NBC News reported.

“Businesses were in the process of closing their doors, steel grates, and you had juveniles that were not allowing businesses to close up. [They were] climbing on the gates,” he said.

Fifty officers from five different agencies ultimately responded to the scene. Nobody was arrested or injured.

Colin Flaherty’s book, “Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry: The Hoax of Black Victimization and Those Who Enable It,” documents black crime in America and exposes how the media and politicians are willing partners in what the author calls “the greatest lie of our generation.”

A second mall incident in New Jersey saw about 500 people breaking out in disturbances over the weekend, as well. NJ.com reported the incident, at Deptford Mall, could have stemmed from a social media post to join in a flash mob event at the site. Officers ultimately ejected the large crowd of mostly juveniles who had gathered at the food court area.

“Sporadic fights erupted in the parking lot,” the Deptford Township Police Department said in a statement reported by NJ.com. The department also said one juvenile was arrested, but nobody injured.

But that’s just a drop in the bucket of what took place this holiday season.

Colin Flaherty, author of “Don’t Make the Black Kids Angry: The Hoax of Black Victimization,” reported several other mall mob incidents have occurred in recent days – most all of them due to under-reported or unreported black violence.

In the American Thinker, Flaherty wrote: “America has a new Christmas tradition: Black mob violence at malls.”

He then went on to say 15 malls around America reported cases of large-scale violence during this Christmas season, leading to “rioting, shooting, looting, rampaging, fighting, throwing rocks at police, damaging cars and more,” and to the death of two.

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Among the mayhem: A riot at Stonecrest Mall near Atlanta involving a “group of black people fighting and pulling each other’s hair,” according to video of the scene, Flaherty wrote. A mob incident at Orange Park Mall by Jacksonville in which “200 black people had to be dispersed from a movie theater on Christmas Day,” he said. An incident at the Eastland Mall near Detroit where “one black person was shot and killed after two groups of black people starting fighting in the foood court,” Flaherty wrote. And a situation in Towson, Maryland, where “two hundred black people threw rocks at police trying to break up a large crows at the local mall,” he reported, in American Thinker.

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