Black activists and their white enablers have just seen to it that no black actor, at least for the foreseeable future, can ever win a meaningful Oscar.

After the utterly cringe-worthy, four-hour, liberal self-flagellation spectacle on Sunday night, our Hollywood friends will not cast an innocent Oscar ballot for years to come.

They have effectively rendered themselves the cinematic equivalent of college admissions officers, routinely choosing black and Hispanic candidates over more qualified white and Asian ones, then attributing the decision to a thousand reasons other than the obvious.

As in university admissions, it is the deserving minority Oscar candidates who will suffer most. Just as in the past, they will wait anxiously to see if they are among the nominated, but in 2017, when that call comes, they will undoubtedly ask themselves, “OK, why did they pick me?”

At the 2017 Oscars, they and the several other minority candidates nominated – there are bound to be a bunch or God help us all – will be patronized much as Hattie McDaniel was at the 1939 Oscars.

George Clooney gave us a taste of just how patronizing Hollywood could be at the 2006 Oscars. “We’re the ones who talked about AIDS when it was just being whispered,” said Clooney, “and we talked about civil rights when it wasn’t really popular. This Academy, this group of people, gave Hattie McDaniel an Oscar in 1939 when blacks were still sitting in the backs of theaters.”

To be sure, the speech did not impress everyone. In a “South Park” episode nicely titled “Smug Alert,” the creators ran his Oscar speech unaltered.

Even black director Spike Lee, an active participant in Sunday’s whine festival, made sense in his attack on Clooney. He noted that Hattie McDaniel played the archetypal “Mammy” in a movie that championed the Southern cause in the Civil War. Said Lee, “To use that as an example of how progressive Hollywood is ridiculous.”

But Hollywood has a way of being ridiculous. This year they gave a standing ovation to the creators of the Oscar winning film “Spotlight,” a movie that exposed child abuse in the Catholic Church.

Jack Cahill’s latest book illustrates how the neo-Puritan progressive movement came to mimic a religion in its structure but not at all in its spirit — order “Scarlet Letters: The Ever-Increasing Intolerance of the Cult of Liberalism”

Just a few years back, these same people gave a standing ovation to Roman Polanski, a man who drugged and anally raped a 13-year-old and then fled the country to avoid prosecution.

And speaking of ridiculous, is there anything more absurd than a man who owns five luxury homes and a gas-guzzling mega yacht lecturing the rest of us about the “big polluters” and the “politics of greed.”

Leonardo DiCaprio, the Oscar winner in question, leaves a larger carbon footprint than even Bigfoot Al Gore. In 2013, for instance, after ringing in the New Year on a yacht in the Sydney Harbor, DiCaprio and his pals chartered a jet and flew 13 hours to Las Vegas so they could ring in the New Year there as well.

“Let us not take this planet for granted,” said a grateful DiCaprio, speaking on behalf of “the billions and billions of underprivileged people out there.” Sure, Leo, whatever.

So let us say Denzel Washington wins the best actor next year for his role as Sam Chisolm in the reboot of the Western classic, “The Magnificent Seven.” Here is the speech he might give:

“I’m very proud to be black, but black is not all I am. That’s my cultural historical background, my genetic makeup, but it’s not all of who I am, nor is it the basis from which I answer every question.” (Actual quote)

“In 1989, I won my first Oscar for ‘Glory.’ In 2001, I won my second Oscar for ‘Training Day.’ The fact that in several past years no black actors were nominated, including the previous two years, made me think that I really deserved the two Oscars I did receive.

“But this year, I don’t know that at all. This year, I suspect my Hollywood friends combed through the list of black actors and asked themselves which one can we nominate whose choice will embarrass us the least.

“I would feel slightly better about my selection, if the Academy had not also nominated Kevin Hart for his role in ‘Ride Along 2.’ No offense, Kevin, but Marlon Brando you ain’t.

“So thank you black activists and thank you Hollywood for cheapening my career and that of every serious black actor in the business.

“I hope you all feel better about yourselves for doing so, but then again you feeling better about yourselves is always what it’s all about. Right, George? Right, Leo?”

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