Hillary Clinton, likely Democratic Party candidate for president, told a national audience during a televised interview on “This Week” with George Stephanopoulos – whose previous employment included work at the White House with former president Bill Clinton – that yes indeed, government has the “right” to regulate the Second Amendment.

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She also said most in the United States respected that “right,” until Antonin Scalia, the recently deceased Supreme Court justice with an eye for constitutional limitations on the political branches, upset that interpretation.

First, the question from Stephanopoulos: “Do you believe an individual’s right to bear arms is a constitutional right? That it’s not linked to the service in the militia?”

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And then, Clinton’s response: “I think that for most of our history, there was a nuanced reading of the Second Amendment, until the decision by the late Justice Scalia. And there was no argument until then that localities, and states, and the federal government had a right – as we do with every amendment – to impose reasonable regulations.”

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She also said, in address of the concept of an individual’s right to bear arms – as purposed by the Constitution – that “if it is a constitutional right, then it, like every other constitutional right, is subject to reasonable regulations.”

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