21 Coptic Christians were beheaded by ISIS terrorists in February, putting Christian persecution, which has been going on for decades in the Middle East, on the world media's radar screen.

21 Coptic Christians were beheaded by ISIS terrorists in February, putting Christian persecution, which has been going on for decades in the Middle East, on the world media’s radar screen.

President George W. Bush famously stood at the site of the 9/11 terror attacks in New York and said Islam was a religion of peace and the Muslim terror attackers were not representative of the faith.

President Obama has declined, repeatedly, to even say the works “Islamic terrorist” and has protected Islam whenever the discussion of terror arises.

In a column in the London Telegraph, parliamentarian Rehman Chishti said the Islamic State, ISIS, really isn’t Islamic and really isn’t a state, so those “sadistic and loathsome murderers” should be called some “derogatory” term like Daesh.

Enough, says Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.

“If we treat religiously motivated violence solely as a security issue, or a political issue, then it will be incredibly difficult – probably impossible – to overcome it,” he said recently. “A theological voice needs to be part of the response, and we should not be bashful in offering that.”

Boris Johnson’s column in the Telegraph quotes Chishti.

In “Stop the Islamization of America: A Practical Guide to the Resistance,” renowned activist Pamela Geller provides the answer, offering proven, practical guidance on how freedom lovers can stop jihadist initiatives in local communities.

His “point is that if you call it Islamic State you are playing their game, you are dignifying their criminal and barbaric behavior; you are giving them a propaganda boost that they don’t deserve, especially in the eyes of some impressionable young Muslims. He wants us all to drop the terms, in favor of more derogatory names such as ‘Daesh’ or ‘Faesh,’ and his point deserves a wider hearing.”

He said he understands why Muslims want the terms “Muslim” or “Islam” removed from the equation.

But he said that if “we deny any connection between terrorism and religion, then we are saying there is no problem in any of the mosques; that there is nothing in the religious texts that is capable of being twisted or misunderstood; that there are no religious leaders whipping up hatred of the West, no perverting of religious belief for political ends.”

He said the real struggle is over power, not spirituality, “but that does not mean we can ignore the potency of the religious dimension. It doesn’t much matter which word we agree on, with Muslim communities, to describe this ideology of terror – Islamism? Islamo-fascism? – but we need to settle on it fast.”

Welby was more direct.

“This requires a move away from the argument that has become increasingly popular, which is to say that ISIS is ‘nothing to do with Islam,’ or that Christian militia in the Central African Republican are nothing to do with Christianity, or Hindu nationalist persecution of Christians in South India is nothing to do with Hinduism.

“Until religious leaders stand up and take responsibility for the actions of those who do things in the name of their religion, we will see no resolution.”

In his address at the Catholic Institute of Paris, Welby also said it is time for Europe to recognize and rediscover its Judeo-Christian roots.

Pamela Geller, at her Atlas Shrugs blog, said: “At last, someone who is willing to approach the truth. This shouldn’t even be controversial: nothing is more obvious than the fact that ISIS has everything to do with Islam.”

In “Stop the Islamization of America: A Practical Guide to the Resistance,” renowned activist Pamela Geller provides the answer, offering proven, practical guidance on how freedom lovers can stop jihadist initiatives in local communities.

 

Note: Read our discussion guidelines before commenting.