As some celebrate Black History Month, and read articles or watch documentaries about the trials and achievements of African-Americans, let us take a brief look at where some things were yesterday – and where they are today.

The original Civil Rights Movement (1865-1896) references the post-Civil War reform movements in the United States aimed at eliminating racial discrimination against “colored” “negro” “Afro” “African-American” and now “black” Americans, and improving educational and employment opportunities. The 100-year period from 1865 and 1965 saw tremendous changes in the fortunes of the black community following the elimination of slavery in the South and the granting of civil rights, generated in all cases by Republicans.

And just as a reminder, contrary to popular belief, the first blacks to arrive in America were not slaves – and the civil rights movement did not begin in the 1960s. It was merely resurrected from an 1860s movement. (See my book, “Black YellowDogs.”)

The year 1865 marked two important events in the history of African-Americans: First, the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, was ratified; then, Union troops arrived in Texas, in June, to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation, giving birth to what many know today as the “Juneteenth Celebrations” (the 19th of June).

Have you ever wondered what African-Americans want, and why they vote Democratic? Do you know how slavery actually began in America? Ben Kinchlow’s best-selling book “Black Yellowdogs” breaks race and politics down in black and white. Get your copy today!

Today, because of left-leaning media and liberal (now called progressive) educators, many young people graduate high school and college with little to no knowledge of the true history of America, black white or otherwise. Is the U.S. a perfect nation? No, and for a simple reason: Where there are human beings, perfection is not the order of the day.

However, let the record show, the American system (and the American people) is an outstanding example of how close an extremely diverse group of people can come to achieving that perfection. (Just between you and me, young blacks today have no concept of real racism.)

Here are a few “used to bes” under something called “The Black Codes” from days when “racism” was accurately defined:

Black people …

  • Were often forbidden to enter town without permission, and their “permission slip” had to give the nature of the visit and the length of the expected stay. They could be imprisoned if discovered out on the street after 10 p.m. without it.
  • Could be declared “vagrant” if determined to be unemployed and/or without permanent residence. If found “guilty,” they could be “indentured” for an unspecified length of time.
  • Could not dispute the word of whites.
  • Were required to stand at attention when whites passed.
  • Were required to step aside when white women passed.
  • Were expected to remove their hats in the presence of whites.
  • Black orphans (and other children) could be hired out to whites. (Many of the “employers” turned out to be their former owners.)

Additionally, the state could determine the type of property and skills blacks could possess.

These black codes often contained a catch-22. For example, blacks could not possess land outside some cities and at the same time could not live in town. The clear objective of these codes was to ensure that no blacks became self-sufficient.

I’d say times changed – dramatically!

Then, fast-forward to “welfare,” designed by Democrat legislators and approved by President Lyndon Johnson. This policy has become the vehicle for re-establishing and maintaining that old plantation mentality. Blacks are no longer to be self-sufficient, but dependent on the government. Massa would no longer reside in a white house in Georgia or Virginia, but in a “White House” in Washington, D.C.

As an American citizen, I have personally gone from not being able to drink from a “whites only” water fountain in the White House, and being forced to use a “colored” rest room during my first visit there, to having lunch with two sitting presidents and witnessing the eight-year term of an officially elected black president of the United States.

As we conclude Black History Month 2017, I think we all can, without reservation, sincerely and gratefully say, “God bless America!”

Have you ever wondered what African-Americans want, and why they vote Democratic? Do you know how slavery actually began in America? Ben Kinchlow’s best-selling book “Black Yellowdogs” breaks race and politics down in black and white. Get your copy today!

Media wishing to interview Ben Kinchlow, please contact media@wnd.com.

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