Christ carrying cross

For Christians around the globe, Good Friday is one of the most important days of the year. And the Easter resurrection of Jesus Christ is not just the foundation of the entire faith, but a cultural touchstone.

But a new book that investigates Passion Week has reached the shocking conclusion Jesus Christ wasn’t actually crucified on that Friday at all.

“The Great Christian Lie,” by James C. DeSelms, argues Christ was crucified on Wednesday, the 13th of Nisan on the Jewish calendar.

DeSelms presents a detailed breakdown of everything Jesus and His disciples did during Passion Week, including an in-depth medical examination of exactly what Messiah endured during His crucifixion. He argues the resurrection took place on the Feast of First Fruits, showing a deep connection between the life of Christ and the biblical calendar and indicating the Passion of Messiah was the culmination of many of the biblical feasts.

Indeed, “The Great Christian Lie” is an invaluable guide for any believer who wants to understand the most important week in human history. It’s also a formidable assemblage of many of the prophetic proofs Jesus was the Jewish Messiah.

At the same time, the book explains why many Jews were so excited upon Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem, believing He was about to liberate them from Roman control. It additionally shows how the position of the Jewish religious leaders was profoundly threatened by His ministry, fueling the hatred that led to Jesus’ execution.

What you may understand about the death, burial and resurrection for Jesus could be a lie. Find out the extraordinary truth about Passion Week, and how God’s plan is even more elegant and wonderful than you could have imagined. “The Great Christian Lie: The Truth On Passion Week” is available now in the WND Superstore.

Through both close textual reading and complimentary historical research, DeSelms gives Christians a fresh perspective on the events surrounding Jesus’ death and His return to life. Many believers may find they can truly understand Passion Week for the first time.

An increasing number of Christian leaders believe Christians are celebrating the resurrection on the wrong day.

“The Council of Nicaea, in 325 AD, agreed that all churches should celebrate Easter (the resurrection) on the same day, but did not designate the date,” DeSelms writes.

“Over time, various dates were used, and today Easter is celebrated on the first Sunday after the full moon following the Vernal Equinox. If the full moon occurred on a Sunday, and thereby coincide with the Passover, Easter was celebrated on the following Sunday. This deliberately ensured that Easter would never be celebrated on Passover.”

But why was this so important to the early church? Why wouldn’t Christians want to keep the biblical calendar and show how the life of Jesus was so deeply linked to the Jewish feasts?

As DeSelms shows, many Jerusalem Christians actually did want to preserve these links. However, the anti-Semitism present in the early church led to a deliberate effort to sever Christianity from its Jewish roots.

“He writes: “[W]e can clearly see that the early church would do whatever was necessary to eliminate any Jewish influence on the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus. It is important to remember that Jesus was a Jew, followed Jewish customs, and obeyed Jewish law. When we remember this fact, and quit trying to apply Christianity to these events, the picture becomes clearer.”

“The Great Christian Lie” blows apart some of the greatest deceptions in the history of the Christian faith. It’s a text no believer genuinely curious about the passion, death and resurrection of the Messiah should ignore.

What you may understand about the death, burial and resurrection for Jesus could be a lie. Find out the extraordinary truth about Passion Week, and how God’s plan is even more elegant and wonderful than you could have imagined. “The Great Christian Lie: The Truth On Passion Week” is available now in the WND Superstore.

 

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