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Government agents in Sudan are telling the Christians who belong to an estimated 25 churches that their buildings are on government land and they are going to be demolished.

Apparently, even if they’re not on the wrong land.

Reports of the escalation of the persecution of Christians in the Muslim-majority country come from the American Center for Law and Justice.

More than a year ago, ACLJ reported when the Sudanese Air Force dropped four bombs on an Episcopal Church of Sudan complex, destroying the compound.

Authorities also bulldozed a Lutheran Church of Sudan building without any warning when local authorities said the church was built on land allocated for business.

And government agents destroyed a 600-worshipper Sudanese Church of Christ to take land for “low-cost housing.”

WND’s acclaimed Whistleblower magazine shows in its powerfully moving April issue, “PERSECUTION RISING,” how today’s treatment of Christians in many nations is disturbingly reminiscent of the brutal persecution of the early followers of Christ.

ACLJ reports this week five churches are appealing the dismissal of their case challenging the government’s plan to demolish more churches and take their land.

“If relief is not granted to these churches, over 25 Sudanese Christian congregations will lose their beloved places of worship and community,” ACLJ said.

Also, Sudan’s National Intelligence and Security Services this week “arrested 12 administrators and teachers at a Christian school in Khartoum, while prohibiting many others from leaving the school’s premises,” ACLJ said.

“NICC claims that leaders at the Evangelical School of Sudan are ‘interfering’ with a Muslim-owned business’s attempts to take over the Christian school. The police efforts seem to assist the Muslim investor at ‘Education Vision’ who has been attempting to take over the school from months.”

The report said now the “illegitimate [government] committee intends to sell off the church land after demolition of the buildings in order to reap a profit.”

The report explained that for years, Christians in Sudan have suffered from the government’s agenda to demolish buildings, mostly accompanied by claims that the land belongs to the government or someone else.

In June 2016, the government, through its Executive Corporation for the Protection of Government Lands, Environment, Roads and Demolition of Irregularities of Khartoum State, named the 25 churches it intends to demolish.

The move, Christian leaders said, was part “of a great systematic campaign to crack down on Christianity.”

In 2014, the government said no new churches could be built, even when existing buildings are destroyed by the government.

“Additionally, in 2012, the Ministry of Endowment canceled the democratically elected committee that had been in place since 1992 to oversee church property, and appointed a corrupt committee that sold most of the church’s land,” ACLJ said.

Meanwhile, the government continues to keep in jail Pastor Hassan, who was “convicted of trumped-up national security crimes he did not commit,” ACLJ said.

The U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, an independent panel commissioned by Congress to report on religious persecution worldwide, said the government of Sudan, led by President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, continues “to engage in systematic, ongoing, and egregious violations of freedom of religion or belief.”

“These violations are the result of President Bashir’s policies of Islamization and Arabization. The government of Sudan prosecutes persons accused of apostasy, imposes a restrictive interpretation of Shariah (Islamic law) and applies corresponding hudood punishments on Muslims and non-Muslims alike, and harasses the country’s Christian community. President al-Bashir and other National Congress Party leaders continue to state that the country will be governed by Shariah law.”

WND’s acclaimed Whistleblower magazine shows in its powerfully moving April issue, “PERSECUTION RISING,” how today’s treatment of Christians in many nations is disturbingly reminiscent of the brutal persecution of the early followers of Christ.

 

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