From his first emergence on the national scene in 2004, Barack Obama and his operatives would invest enormous political capital in what biographer David Remnick called his “signature appeal: the use of the details of his own life as a reflection of a kind of multicultural ideal.”

“My parents shared not only an improbable love,” Obama told the Democratic conventioners in 2004, “they shared an abiding faith in the possibilities of this nation.”

In 2009, Obama shared with America’s schoolchildren how long this blessed union endured. “My father left my family when I was 2 years old,” he told them, “and I was raised by a single mother.”

Of course, the entire story was a fraud, and in his massive new biography, “Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama,” Pulitzer Prize-winner David Garrow confirms as much.

“The young couple never chose to live together at any time following the onset of Ann’s pregnancy,” writes Garrow, “and Ann relocated herself a long airplane flight away as soon as her son was old enough to travel.”

For most liberals reading this passage, including those in the media, the mom’s flight to Seattle will come as news. Citizen journalists, however, were writing about Obama’s nativity fraud nine years ago.

Conservative activist Michael Patrick Leahy self-published a book, “What Does Barack Obama Believe?” in the summer of 2008. He did the legwork the major media were not doing. He interviewed Ann Dunham’s high-school friends and fixed her in Seattle long before anyone else had.

The mainstream media turned a blind eye. Not one of the first several book-length biographies about Obama placed Dunham anywhere other than Hawaii during Obama’s first two years.

The same holds true for the magazine bios I researched for my 2011 book, “Deconstructing Obama.” This includes a lengthy, multi-part series on Obama’s early years by the Washington Post’s Pulitzer Prize-winning David Maraniss. Maraniss and Leahy were writing at the same time.

This is not an incidental detail. The mother’s exile to Washington meant no less than that the famed multicultural marriage, the rock on which Obama built his political career, was pure sand.

New Yorker editor David Remnick was the first of the orthodox scribes to break the silence with the spring 2010 publication of his Obama bio, “The Bridge.” He mentions the Washington exile casually as if to suggest that it was common knowledge.

Remnick buffers the news further by claiming that Ann took “extension courses” in the fall and implies that she did not arrive until the spring semester.

To sustain the Obama family mythology, Remnick claimed that in fall 1962 “Ann went with the baby to Cambridge briefly to visit her husband, but that trip was a failure and she returned to Hawaii.” Garrow rejects this possibility.

In her 2011 biography of Obama’s mother, “A Singular Woman,” the New York Times’ Janny Scott concedes Dunham did go to Seattle but, like Remnick, she plays games with the timeline.

“In the spring quarter of 1962, as Obama was embarking on his final semester in Hawaii, Ann was enrolled at the University of Washington in Seattle,” Scott writes.

As in Remnick’s case, this is borderline fraud. Scott conceals the larger truth that Ann had already been at the university for months. Garrow confirms this as well.

Like her fellow scribes, the Boston Globe’s Sally Jacobs chose to duck the truth about Obama’s origins in her 2011 biography, “The Other Barack: The Bold and Reckless Life of President Obama’s Father.”

“Dunham would, in fact, enroll at U-Dub [the University of Washington] the following spring,” wrote Jacobs, temporarily ignoring Dunham’s attendance in the fall.

Jacobs claimed that, yes, Dunham flew to Seattle in August 1961 with her newborn, but she was passing through on her way to Boston to look into job possibilities for herself.

Why Boston? Obama Sr. “had been accepted into graduate school there and they would likely move the following year.” Jacobs reports this absurdity with a straight face.

When Dunham returned to Hawaii after her whirlwind trip to the mainland, Jacobs claimed that that “every now and then” Obama Sr. took his wife and baby out to meet friends. This is nonsense.

As to Obama’s birth in Hawaii, Garrow adds as confirmation the recollections of several relatives who allege to remember from 50-something years ago Obama’s grandmother or grandfather calling them “from the hospital” with news of the baby’s birth.

“Fifty years later,” Garrow writes, “[Obama’s great aunt] expressed astonishment that some of her long-time neighbors in Maumelle, Arkansas, doubted the fact of her grandnephew’s birth.”

This was Garrow’s signal of contempt for those in fly-over country who ever doubted the story the media had been feeding them.

The mainstream books on Obama Garrow considers “valuable.” As to the rest, they are apparently not worth taking about. So he doesn’t.

Despite having written two books on Obama, I am cited only once in Garrow’s book and then in the endnotes. The reference is to Obama’s early poem “Pop.”

Remnick and the others claimed the poem was about Obama’s grandfather. I argued much more convincingly it was about Obama’s Communist mentor, Frank Marshall Davis.

Although Garrow admits Davis’ party membership and although he knows I am right about “Pop,” he adds this petty dig in parentheses: “someone who is cited with the greatest reluctance.”

Yes, the truth comes very reluctantly to all these people.

Order Jack Cashill’s latest groundbreaking book, “TWA 800: The Crash, the Cover-up and the Conspiracy”

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