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“Made in USA” matters not only to American consumers, but also to American companies (and even foreign-based ones).

But if you believe a writer of a recent CNN article, most American consumers don’t care about Buying American. A casual observance of several advertisements and product labeling by popular American brands, however, would seem to indicate that Buying American does in fact matter.

If it didn’t, then why did Florida’s Natural orange juice spend at least 13 seconds of their 15-second television commercial explaining how Simply Orange and Pepsi-owned Tropicana import some of their oranges while Florida’s Natural gets their oranges from only from Florida?

Less than two seconds of Florida Natural’s commercial is devoted to anything other than emphasizing “Buy American” by saying the phrase “Great Taste – Naturally” at the end of the commercial.

Florida’s Natural is a cooperative of more than 1,000 grower-owners (organized in 1933) and works over 60,000 acres of Central Florida citrus groves. They own the land, nurture and harvest the fruit, and then package it in Central Florida.

Florida’s Natural, according to their website, is committed to 100 percent Florida oranges and never any imports.

If touting “Made in USA” to American consumers doesn’t matter to American companies, why does Whirlpool place stickers on their appliances that say: Whirlpool World Class appliances built with American Pride. Employing more U.S. workers than any other major appliance maker. Designed, Engineered & Assembled in the USA? At least that’s what is on the inside of my American-made Whirlpool refrigerator that I bought in 2008 and still runs flawlessly.

Check out the best of Roger Simmermaker, in “How Americans Can Buy American” and “My Company ‘Tis of Thee” in the WND Superstore.

If “Made in USA” doesn’t matter to American consumers in the minds of American companies, why do Campbell’s soup cans display “Cooked with Care in the USA” on the labels?

Why does White House Foods advertise their Fresh Pressed apple juice as “Straight from the local orchards, Made from 100% Homegrown Apples,” and “Made from U.S.A Apples”?

Why does PC Matic advertise its Internet protection software as researched and developed exclusively in the United States?

Why does the back of my iPod (which is admittedly assembled offshore) say that it was designed and engineered in the USA? Answer: Because all American jobs (such as those in engineering, design, research & development. Testing, etc.) matter – not just the ones in manufacturing. Apple also recently began making its Mac Pro computer in the United States, and aggressively marketed their new product as American made. The bottom line? If American companies have enough profits to hire more American workers at higher wages than offshore workers at lower wages, they can often be persuaded to do so.

Why did WeatherTech air Super Bowl ads in 2014 and 2017 to communicate the fact that their Illinois-based company prides itself in “Manufactured in the USA” floor mats, made “by Americans with American materials”? That’s quite an expensive venture to get the “American made” word out if no one really cares.

Why does Yeungling constantly advertise that it is “America’s Oldest Brewery”? All Yeungling beer is proudly made in America by an American-owned company, and they are not shy about advertising that fact. Contrast that to foreign-owned Anheuser-Busch (formerly based in St. Louis, Missouri) that was acquired by Belgium-Brazilian-owned AB InBev and used to display “American-owned” beer signs in various establishments. Anheuser-Busch can no longer produce those signs because their products are no longer American owned.

Why did American-owned DeWalt create a “Built in the USA” campaign for their American-made cordless drills? All of the components may not be made in America, but Made in the USA with global components is better than Made in China any day of the week.

Only American workers pay taxes to America. Workers in foreign countries pay no taxes to America, and therefore pay nothing to fund the things that are important to Americans like national defense, education, Social Security, public schools, hospitals, and colleges, and paying off our ever-increasing national debt.

The only way we can sustain ourselves and the independence of our nation is to buy American-made products from American-owned companies, thereby keeping jobs, profits, and tax revenue within our national borders. Anything less is a prescription for more debt, eventual nationally declared bankruptcy, and the end of our beloved country as we know it.

Check out the best of Roger Simmermaker, in “How Americans Can Buy American” and “My Company ‘Tis of Thee” in the WND Superstore.

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