Manspreading-1

First, they came after mansplaining …

Where will the madness end? Man-sleeping? Man-eating? Man-breathing? The terms “mansplaining” and “manspreading” weren’t even words ten years ago. Thanks to progressive thinkers, however, if there’s a way to put “man” at the beginning of something you don’t like, you’re guaranteed a horde of ready supporters to beat down whatever you don’t like.

“The Mujeres en Lucha group made banning manspreading a major cause,” Travel Pulse warns readers, “and got its petition all the way to the mayor’s office.” The city of Madrid now bans the practice on their transit busses.

For those unaware, manspreading, an evil deed perpetrated by men who assume privilege, makes women “feel” uncomfortable. Forget that women are also guilty of amassing bags, purses, and whatnot to such a degree that they – ahem – spread into adjoining spaces. Forget asking politely to make use of an otherwise free seat on the bus. Manspreading must be targeted!

Check out the video below to get the nitty gritty on this lowdown, socially unacceptable behavior!

But how polite is it to ascribe rude behavior to just one sex? Proper etiquette, sorry to say, is not the domain of even the fairer sex. So, to intimate that undesirable behavior is the domain of men is, sadly, quite rude. It is, however, the increasing norm for a society that thinks nothing of what it sounds or looks like while attempting correct what others sound or look like.

Typical white male man spreader, Ben Franklin. Evil, evil, evil!

Typical white male man spreader, Ben Franklin. Evil, evil, evil!

One can only imagine the brouhaha if the oppression of woman-sassing or woman-wimping ever arose for discussion!



Graduate Bingo

Graduation: A guide for parents

Nabbing that coveted diploma can pose serious challenges. Study, perseverance, learning to navigate or bypass difficult individuals, persnickety professors, making homework a priority and striving for that “A” grade are all something to celebrate. Getting through a graduation ceremony, however, can be all of that packed into hours of mind-numbing speeches with no recess and no reward.

So, here’s the insider’s guide to how to look thrilled – or at least not bored off your gourd – at the entrée of yet another commencement speaker. Graduation Bingo!

Bill Byrne, creator of Graduation Bingo, introduced the app back in 2013. Notre Dame, thanks to a personal connection between Byrne and his alumni daughter, has their own specialty version. But not to worry: If you’re low tech or no tech – or wary of celebratory blips that may clue others into the source of that smile – there are hand held bingo templates aplenty online.

Whatever you do to make it through that ceremony, don’t forget to give yourself a clap on the back. If you’re in the audience supporting that grad, it’s not only he or she that should be receiving acknowledgement!



Furry dinosaur

Fluffy feathers or scaly skin?

Get that fairy story of a scaly skinned T-Rex hurtling over prehistoric plants after screeching cavemen out of your mind. No. Wait. Stand by.

According to Mashable, “A new study published Wednesday in the journal Biology Letters suggests it (the T. rex) had ‘scaly, reptilian-like skin.'”

But isn’t that what the majority of the world’s population believes? The Jurassic Park franchise sure thought so.

Dinosaur aficionados, however, aren’t as settled on the matter. If you’ve missed out, there has been a theory circulating about feathered, fluffy T. rexes. You got it. Forget the scaly dino-lizard and cozy up to Big Bird with razor teeth, sickle-like claws, and the insatiable appetite of a teenaged boy in an endless growth spurt.

The theory gained fuel after the appearance of Dilong, a distant and much smaller relative of T. rex that showed evidence of feather-like filaments. The evidence led scientists to speculate the animal had been covered in insulating feathers. But such insulation would overheat larger animals.

And yet the fantasy flew of a feathered T. rex. Wishful thinking? Or sound science? Who knows? Scientists still disagree.

“Now that we’ve found these multiple patches of preserved tyrannosaur hide from multiple places across the body, it looks pretty clear that at least the majority of the T. rex was not covered in feathers,” University of Alberta paleontologist Scott Persons told National Geographic.

While, “Stephen Brusatte, a tyrannosaur expert at the University of Edinburgh and a National Geographic Society grantee, told NatGeo that he wouldn’t be surprised if the T. rex shed feathers over time, but that it would be premature to say they were completely featherless.”

The video below gives you more details on what the argument is about.

But, in truth, unless these ancient giants are brought back to life, the debate will likely continue.



Clean sheets

Clean sheets and one cute critter

There’s nothing like slipping into bed when there are fresh sheets and pillowcases. Humans aren’t the only ones to enjoy that simple pleasure. Take a look!

Awww!

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