quran

Muslims leaders in India say they will not abide by the Indian Supreme Court’s ban of the quickie divorces allowed under Islamic law.

“If a law is made which is against Shariah, then it will be unacceptable to us. And like such other laws, it too will meet the same fate that it will remain a law but will not be followed,” said Muhammad Saeed Noori, the general secretary of the Mumbai-based Raza Academy.

Syed Parvez Qaisar, a leader of the Muslim League, called it “interference” in Muslim law.

The comments were reported by the Middle East Media Research Institute.

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court of India “delivered a landmark verdict invalidating the practice of instant triple talaq (divorce) among Indian Muslims,” MEMRI said. “The verdict is a milestone in the journey of the Muslim women’s rights movement in India. Prior to this decision, a Muslim husband could divorce his wife by uttering ‘talaq’ three times in the presence of two witnesses in one sitting – either informally or formally through a letter, email, WhatsApp, and so on.

“This instant form of divorce is called talaq-e-biddat, is irrevocable, and is valid in Shariah law. The other form of triple talaq is called talaq-e-hasan, whereby a husband delivers one talaq each over the course of three months,” the report said.

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The judges were not unanimous, but the majority voted to ban the practice.

It already had been abolished by a couple of dozen Muslim majority nations, and the report said it has “emerged as a social disease in India in recent years.”

“Muslim women, affected by the unilateral divorce by their husbands, were frequently approaching courts to give them a sense of justice against the instant form of divorce.”

However, the report said, Maulana Arshad Madani, chief of the Jamiat Uleme-e-Hind, or the assembly of Indian Islamic scholars, said the verdict is “contrary to Shariah.”

“The coming days can give birth to many other problems for Muslims,” he said.

He accused the court of trying to “transform the country into a Hindu nation.”

Several Islamic publications called it a “setback” to Islam.

“Regardless of the court ruling, the practice of talaq, incuding instant triple talaq, will continue in the country and will be considered valid,” threatened Madani.

“I want to state in unequivocal terms that [the practice of instant triple] talaq will continue to happen even though it is the worst sin in Islam; even instantaneous talaq will happen. If you want to punish the person, you can, but the divorce will be deemed to have happened [as per Shariah].”

Scholars at the Darul Uloom Deoband, the second largest Islamic seminary after Cairo’s Al-Azhar University, “warned that no interference in Shariah will be tolerated,” the report continued.

MEMRI said it is evident that Islamic leaders “are perturbed at the verdict.”

“This is largely because the court order not only undercuts the role of Islamic clerics in the life of Muslims, but also because Muslim women in India are openly challenging the legitimacy of instant triple talaq. The clerics are also fearful that the verdict could open different provisions of Muslim personal law to judicial scrutiny in coming years.”

In “Stop the Islamization of America: A Practical Guide to the Resistance,” renowned activist Pamela Geller offers proven, practical guidance on how freedom lovers can stop jihadist initiatives in local communities.

 

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