(SPACE.COM) — Much of the Eastern Hemisphere will be treated to a partial eclipse of the moon Monday (Aug. 7) — a prelude to the grand spectacle that awaits North Americans exactly two weeks later.

The lunar eclipse will be visible from parts of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia, and peaks 2:20 p.m. EDT (1820 GMT). Even if you’re not in the path of the partial lunar eclipse, Monday will bring a summer full moon to the night sky. Traditionally, some Native American fishing tribes were aware that sturgeon — a large fish that inhabited the Great Lakes as well as Lake Champlain — were most readily caught around the time of the August full moon, hence it became known as the Full Sturgeon Moon. A few tribes knew it as the Full Red Moon because, as the moon rises, it appears reddish through any sultry haze. It was also called the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon.

You can watch the partial lunar eclipse live on Slooh.com beginning at 11:45 a.m. EDT (1545 GMT). The webcast will last through 3:20 p.m. EDT (1920 GMT) and feature special guest commentators and live eclipse views from Slooh’s partner observatories in Africa, Asia and Australia. You can also watch the webcast live on Space.com, courtesy of Slooh.

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