On Friday, President Trump spent a few seconds writing another tweet, and it said, “Comey exonerated Hillary Clinton long before the investigation was over … and so much more, A rigged system.”

It was another tweet the president shouldn’t have sent.

Marine Gen. John Kelly is President Trump’s current chief of staff. Kelly has had much experience as both a general and as head of Homeland Security. He should (and as I said in a column last week) tell President Trump to stop tweeting. It is way beneath the office and way beneath his presidency.

And Hillary Clinton should have never written her book, “What Happened.” Who cares about last November’s election? President Trump won it fair and square.

Among other mistakes Hillary Clinton made, she did not campaign in states she should have. People did not like her or trust her judgment, and that is one of the major reasons she lost. It does not mean that people will vote again for Donald Trump. However, the Democrats must put up someone who appeals to the middle voter.

Townhall, a Republican-oriented news site, wrote an article this week headlined “Geezer World.” It said the Democrats had no one young to put up for president. It went on to say: “We know that the Democratic Party is in a total state of disarray. They’re struggling to fundraise, they have no leader, they can’t win elections, and they have no message. There are 1,000 fewer Democrats in office than there were in 2008-09.”

In Politico this week, former candidate and Gov. Dr. Howard Dean said: “The older generation – Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders – would be tested and experienced on the national stage, with high name recognition and built-in support. They’d also all be in their 70s, people who’ve been around forever for Trump to use as perfect foils for exactly what he stands against.”

Now, there is also a bipartisan candidacy that has been rumored this week. It is Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio, and Gov. John Hickenlooper, D-Colo., teaming up. Kasich is 65, and Hickenlooper is also 65. Although not from generation X or the millennial generation, they are a lot younger than most people the Democrats have thought of running, and they will be several years younger than President Trump.

Kasich and Hickenlooper teamed up and wrote a column about health care, saying: “The fate of America’s health-care system, the focus of our nation’s most important – and most heavily politicized – public-policy debate, is in the hands of the Senate, where senators get their turn to find a balanced and sustainable approach to health-care reform. It is clear that the bill passed by the House in May will not meet the challenges of our health-care system. This bill calls into question coverage for the vulnerable, fails to provide the necessary resources to ensure that no one is left out and puts the health and well-being of millions of hard-working people in our states at risk, while shifting significant costs to the states. Medicaid provisions included in this bill are particularly problematic.

“All Americans will come out on the losing end if we simply replace one divisive plan with another, having failed to find a bipartisan solution to bring lasting reform that can be sustained across administrations. It will be worse yet if senators – like House members before them – decide these questions behind closed doors, avoiding the open discussion and transparency needed to make the American people full participants in this vital debate.”

Health care reform is just one of our current problems. Full transparency is vital; our fast-paced and Internet-based lives demand it. We had a national emergency this week with Hurricane Harvey. It is going to wind up being the most expensive hurricane in the history of the United States.

It is time to come together as citizens and to stop reviewing the 2016 election. It will get us nowhere. We have bigger problems.

Both President Trump and Secretary Hillary Clinton are unable to let the November 2016 election go, and Americans are tired of the rehashing.

It is clear the bill passed by the House in May will not meet the challenges of our health-care system. This bill calls into question coverage for the vulnerable, fails to provide the necessary resources to ensure no one is left out and puts the health and well-being of millions of hard-working people in our states at risk, while shifting significant costs to the states. Medicaid provisions included in this bill are particularly problematic.

All Americans will come out on the losing end if we simply replace one divisive plan with another, having failed to find a bipartisan solution to bring lasting reform that can be sustained across administrations. It will be worse yet if senators – like House members before them – decide these questions behind closed doors, avoiding the open discussion and transparency needed to make the American people full participants in this vital debate.

A bipartisan ticket is clearly the answer, and that kind of ticket will win in 2020.

Media wishing to interview Ellen Ratner, please contact [email protected].

 

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