Clock calendar

One second after clocks say 1:59:59 early Sunday morning, Nov. 5, it will be 1 a.m. for most Americans and Europeans, not 2 a.m., as it’s the weekend for the annual shift from daylight saving time to standard time.

The time change first was utilized during World War I in an effort to save energy.

That reasoning doesn’t make as much sense these days, National Geographic said. A 2008 National Bureau of Economic Research study found that while demand for lighting dropped with the change, the savings were canceled by increasing energy demands for air conditioning.

And a separate Australian study found changing the time there “did indeed drop lighting and electricity use in the evenings – but that higher energy demands during darker mornings completely canceled out the evening gains.”

The Bible story is more miraculous and astounding than you could have imagined. See the remarkable proof of the unchanging nature of God – and the exciting clues to what awaits at the end of days in “God’s Day Timer” by Mark Biltz, available as a book or documentary now in the WND Superstore.

Now, many are calling for daylight saving time to be scrapped.

First, according to National Geographic, there’s evidence of an impact on health.

A 2012 study by Martin Young at the University of Alabama at Birmingham found a 10 percent increase in the risk of heart attacks on the Monday and Tuesday after the clocks are moved ahead each spring.

There was no similar increase observed in the fall, when clocks are turned back.

“Sleep deprivation, the body’s circadian clock, and immune responses all can come into play when considering reasons that changing the time by an hour can be detrimental to someone’s health,” Young explained at the time.

CBS cited researchers from the University of Pennsylvania who found that assaults go up by nearly 3 percent immediately after the clocks are set back.

“Sleep problems have previously been associated with increased antisocial and criminal behavior, so we were surprised to find that increased sleep was associated with increased offending,” said Richard Perry University professor Adrian Raine when the results, which also showed assault reports went down slightly after the “spring forward” change, were released.

Car accidents, workplace injuries and suicides all have increased on the day after the changes, according to studies.

Chronic tiredness can result whenever a shift is made to a body’s routine. Then, too, television watching drops each year during the first week after the change.

The QZ.com blog reported the twice-annual clock changes can leave people “cranky, lazy, and possibly dangerous,” because they depend on circadian rhythms for falling asleep.

“Disrupting these, say with a one-hour time change, messes with your rhythms and international clock system. … Which can leave you feeling fussy,” the report said. “If you don’t fall asleep quickly, you’ll feel less rested in the morning, which contributes to moodiness. Even getting extra sleep in the morning to make up for lost time is problematic, as it’s another disruption to routine, which further confuses your body.”

Historically, the idea of daylight saving time was proposed by Benjamin Franklin to extend the business day.

Religious faiths with set times for prayer and schools objected.

Even so, various attempts to end the practice have failed.

As the federal government doesn’t require the time change, Arizona (with the exception of Navajo lands), Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands don’t observe daylight saving time.

Around the globe, there are nearly 80 nations that take part in the twice-a-year ritual, mostly in North America, Europe, southern portions of Africa, South America and Australia.

Since 2007, daylight saving time has begun the second Sunday in March and ended the first Sunday in November.

The next change will be March 11, 2018.

The Bible story is more miraculous and astounding than you could have imagined. See the remarkable proof of the unchanging nature of God – and the exciting clues to what awaits at the end of days in “God’s Day Timer” by Mark Biltz, available as a book or documentary now in the WND Superstore.

 

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